Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentLaw Enforcement & Police · 1 decade ago

Why the six-pointed Star of David a sheriff's badge?

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  • River
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago
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    Some of the earliest known American law enforcement badges were found in the larger East Coast cities. These followed the example of their English predecessors and were rayed stars as can be found in the first issue Boston and Baltimore badges. They were totally custom die-struck pieces, based on the Star Medallions of Chivalric Orders with raised lettering and the armorial bearings or seal of their City. These were well suited to the larger and financially well off Municipal Departments. As smaller Cities and Towns began to institute their own agencies to supplement the County Sheriff's Offices, a more cost-effective solution was sought.

    The plain five point, six point and seven point star badges made their appearance. These could be lettered with the City, Town, County and Department's name much more economically. The chivalric rayed star within a wreath badge became the five or six point star within a circle or crescent. At approximately the same time another type of badge was developing, this was the shield. Again, its origins were based on the armor carried by the Knights and Men at Arms that were modern law enforcements predecessors.

    It was not common for the Frontier Lawman of the mid-1800s to wear a badge. In small towns and villages where the citizens knew each other there was no need to identify the Constable or Town Marshal. But, as the cattle industry and mining brought new people to the Frontier Towns it became necessary to have a means of marking the local Peace Officer. Many Lawmen did not have access to a jeweler or badge manufacturer so they made their badges from the materials at hand. The tin star refers to badges cut from a tin can in the shape of a star or from the bottom of a can as a circle cutout star. Another popular method was to use a coin and cut out a star from the center. This was a common practice with Texas Rangers, who used the 1800s Mexican Ocho Reales (pieces of eight) coin in the manufacture of their badges. It is interesting to note that this practice was resurrected in 1962 when the Rangers resumed making their badges from 1940s Mexican Cinco Peso coins.

    Source(s): Deputy Sheriff
  • 3 years ago

    Sheriff Badges

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  • 3 years ago

    Sheriff Star

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Looking at sheriff's badges (http://www.thelastbestwest.com/old_west_sheriff_ba... ), some were five-pointed stars, some six-pointed stars, some shields...it was probably just general preference in any given area.

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  • 4 years ago

    I've never seen a sheriff's badge symbolized by a "Star of David". A "Star of David" is a a six-pointed figure consisting of two interlaced equilateral triangles. The typical sheriff's badge is merely an object with 6 (or 5 or 7) points.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Dunno, probably bloody mindedness, but I know why they have a 5 pointed star in Milwaukee.

    http://nationalconversation.typepad.com/the_nation...

    More bloodymindedness and probably kickbacks.

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