Recently moved to NY from Singapore. Is there anyone here from Singapore that can give advice on adjusting?

Any advice on getting around, meeting people,etc?

Update:

I used to live in singapore and now live in NY. Can anyone give advice on how to adjust to living in NY?

5 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    1. Use English

    2. Singaporeans don't speak english. They speak straight and straight-forward "SINGLISH"

    3. Their Chinese is "SINGNESE"

    4. Don't use long english. Just use simple engilsh

    5. Try taking the MRT to save

    6. They eat at a Hawker Center or a hot and smelly food court.

    If they want to drink tea or coffee, they goto 'kopi tiam' instead

    Starbucks

    There is more. But I won't say it. B cause is 2 long. But I want to give you a long advice below. But it is "Malaysian Style" it is similar to Singaporeans. IF I MARK A '^^^' on a top...

    EXAMPLE: Lesson 1^^^ that means is 100% like S'pore

    *Malaysian Style*

    Lesson 1^^^

    You have just landed in Changi International Airport and the

    first thing you want to do is to call your S'pore friend.

    If you're calling him at home or at the office, the first

    thing to say on the phone is "Eh, what you doing?". If you're calling him on the handphone the

    standard greeting is "Eh, where are you?"

    Lesson 2^^^

    Your S'pore friend has graciously offered to pick you up

    from the airport. He said "Give me half an hour...", be prepared to wait at least one

    and a half hours. This is probably your first encounter with

    S'pore Timing. There's no need to adjust your watch.

    Whatever time a Malaysian tells you, just add another hour, and you won't go wrong.

    Lesson 3^^^

    You have no friends in S'pore (yet) and you decide to take

    a cab from the airport. You'll soon realize that the one-way taxi fare is more expensive than a night's stay at most decent hotels.

    Lesson 4^^^(if ur a female, forget it)

    If your friendly limo or taxi driver, says "Sir, you want to

    try some Thai chicken?", he's definitely not suggesting a

    good place for Thai food. If you encounter the word "chicken" in a taxi, hotel lobby or

    street corner, it usually means a lady who charges you a fee in exchange for pleasure.

    Lesson 5^^^

    If you're a newbie expat, your colleagues/ friends will definitely

    introduce you to the mini N.Y.C. of S'pore, Orchard Road. Believe me, there are other

    more interesting places to shop, eat and drink. .

    Lesson 6^^^

    Since you're heading for Orchard Road anyway, you ought to know

    that was a Eat, Drink, Shop(E.D.S) . Some of the local and forgeniers meet there try their very best to spend and swipe with their credit card like the US. Complete with branded stuff and Xpensive stuff in their hands

    Lesson 7^^^

    Why do S'pore call all Caucasians "Mat Sallehs"? About a

    hundred years ago, drunkard sailors from the West were a

    common sight in the Port area. The locals used to call them "Mad Sailors". Somehow, it got corrupted into the Malay

    name "Mat Salleh". The Chinese/ Cantonese will still call you"Gwai-Loh" or "Devil". To the more polite Hokkiens you're a "Ang Moh" or "Red Hair".

    Lesson 8^^^

    If your Chinese friends invite you to join them for a

    Chinese meal like "Hokkien Mee" or "Bak Kut Teh", eat as

    much as you can. You're never gonna get it anywhere else.

    Not even in China, Taiwan or Hong Kong. There's another

    'South East Asia' invention, the "Yee Sang" or raw fish salad

    (served during the Chinese New Year). Before I forget,if you're the queasy type, avoid ordering

    "spare-parts" when you're having "Bak Kut Teh", unless you fancy all the internal parts of a pig.

    Lesson 9^^^

    When you're in a restaurant, always "pop" the disposable

    tissue packet as loud as you can. Don't worry, nobody will

    get annoyed. Usually, at the end of a ten course dinner,

    there'll be one "Big Bang" as everybody "pop" theirs. In

    order to express your appreciation to your generous host,

    remember to throw in a loud belch as well. Although it may

    be normal in your

    own country, don't ask the waiter for a separate bill

    (check). Either you pay for everything or just keep your

    mouth (and wallet) shut. If you feel bad about it, offer to

    pay the next time. Anyway, don't worry too much about

    it as most locals know that most Mat Sallehs are "stingy buggers"...

    Lesson 10

    Don't like to be a stingy Mat? Take your friends to a Mamak stall 'MAMAK stall is road side stall/restaurant which opens at night. Remember to order teh tarik or kopi. Which is their popular drinks "fish-head curry" restaurant. Order the prawns and the crabs as well. Be totally reckless, don't ask about the prices and don't check your bill as well. I guarantee you'll find a big hole. The one in your pocket, not the ones you're always

    chasing in S'pore. Whether you're in a five-star hotel or

    at a roadside stall, always ask for the "bill". Nobody will

    understand when you say "check" or "tab". Need a paper napkin or serviette? Just say "tissue". (for Hawker Centers and MAMAK's

    Lesson 11

    Every Wednesday or Thursday night is Ladies' Night at the

    "fun pubs" and discos. That's the night when most club

    operators get rid of all their stale

    and unwanted alcohol. They mix it into some strange

    cocktails and give it away free to the ladies. Ladies' Night

    is actually Men's Night! That's the time when all the

    predatory "buayas" (crocodiles) go out in full force. Stick

    to normal nights, you'll find less competition. If you're a

    lady, stay away from the "buayas" and the free drinks (unless it's

    pouring brands).

    Lesson 12

    Stop hassling the street vendor who sold you a 3 VCD set of

    "The Titanic" that didn't exactly meet the ISO 9000

    specifications. C'mon, what can you buy for US $3 back home? Besides, you should listen to your own government and not buy pirated stuff.

    Lesson 13

    Malaysian drivers tend to slow down when they come across

    any road accidents. They are not being cautious nor are they

    intending to give assistance. They must catch a glimpse of

    that ever important "Number". Even

    if the number (license) plate is broken into a million

    pieces,* *the passersby will patiently re-assemble it just

    to obtain that "lucky" number. Then, it's off to the 4D

    betting shops. If the numbers don't come this way, they do

    some quick interpretation of their dreams through the handy

    Chinese Dream Book. It looks like a Clip Art Visual Catalog.

    Nightmares are included

    as well....

    Source(s): Can you give me 10 points. I typed all those from a old magazine of mine.
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  • 1 decade ago

    Hahah...I just moved from Singapore to NY. Lol

    Erm, it's really to adjust to Singapore. It's alot like New York. Ppl are really friendly.

    Couple of places you should visit:

    1) Villa Bali, lock road

    2) NY cheese cake factory: Siglap

    3) Cafe Del Mar: Sentosa

    Enjoy your stay!

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  • 1 decade ago

    I'm in San Antonio Texas now. I just moved last September. Well first thing first settle in your housing and find basic necessities nearest to your place... post office, bank, supermarket, gas station. Then you can search for a good Oriental Supermarket for your Chinese cravings.

    People here in Texas are friendly but I'm not so sure about New York.. Be yourself and also be very aware. Don't be naive. Open your eyes to see how people live about their daily lives. Good Luck.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The above answerer is a Malaysian, not a Singaporean. All of it is not true!

    Getting around Singapore, it's handy to know some websites like:

    http://www.streetdirectory.com.

    http://www.sbstransit.com.sg/

    You can also visit websites for expats like yourself:

    http://www.singaporeexpats.com/

    http://www.expatsingapore.com/

    They organise gatherings for fellow expats so you might just meet some friends from your hometown.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    hmm

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