KR asked in Family & RelationshipsWeddings · 1 decade ago

Invitation wording question...?

My fiance's sister was married and is legally separated, although not divorced, from her husband, has been for years. She kept her married name. Her current live-in boyfriend is her ex's brother, so obviously, same last name.

Do I word the invitation as "Jane Smith and John Smith" or "Jane and John Smith"?

Update:

These are for invitations to MY wedding.

22 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The most correct thing would be to send two seperate invitations, in two seperate envelopes. (If you want to save postage, it's OK to put both envelopes into one big plain white envelope.) However, if long term live-togethers, including same sex couples, consider themselves to be married, go ahead and send them a joint invite. When the couple doesn't fit the "Mr & Mrs" format, you name each member of the couple on a seperate line, as in:

    Ms. Jane Smith

    Mr. John Smith

    234 Primrose Path #5

    Peyton Place, Nevada

    You didn't ask, but the most correct thing is for each and every guest to receive a personal invitation with his/her very own name on the envelope, and this includes even small children. The only exception is the joint invitation for married (or darn near married) couples. As above, you may save postage by mailing a single large envelope to each household, addressed like this:

    Family Smith

    234 Primrose Path #5

    Peyton Place, Nevada

    The "and guest" type invitation should NEVER be issued. Say "and guest" and you'll end up with people treating their OWN guests (people you don't know and don't care to know) to a champagne dinner and live music at YOUR expense -- instead of spending your money on people you know and care about.

    People who can't manage a simple social event like a wedding without a date don't deserve to have a social life -- let the dull things stay home. But if you're soft-hearted and want to let folks bring a date, you should send that date a personal invitation in his/her very own name.

    Source(s): Miss Manners' Guide to Excrutiatingly Correct Behavior by Judith Martin (Atheneum Press)
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  • 1 decade ago

    Jane Smith and John Smith

    there not married to each other

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  • SE
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Jane Smith and John Smith.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I would say use Jane Smith and John Smith

    By saying Jane and John Smith you imply that they are married....

    He's just her boyfriend - the aren't married so just word the invitations how you would if her last name was something different

    Miss Jane Jones and Mr. John Smith

    Hope this helps!

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  • 1 decade ago

    definitely Jane Smith and John Smith.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Jane and John Smith sounds better - the correct way would be Jane Smith and John Smith - but Jane and John looks and sounds better.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    How about Jane Smith and Guest

    if not, if thats too formal or reduces him, then yes, Jane Smith and John Smith.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Jane Smith and John Smith. Since they aren't married, you really should keep it separate. "Jane and John Smith", though a space saver, implies that they are a married couple. Interesting situation, lol. Definitely interesting wedding table conversation!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Since they are not married, go with "Ms. Jane Smith and Mr. John Smith"

    Congratulations!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Um she is not divorced from the brother and is getting married again? that would be an illegal marriage for one..

    Needs to get the divorce finalized before worrying about wording invites to her wedding to the guys brother..

    Wow what a situation to be in ..

    As for the wording you word it just as any other couple getting married both names.. Miss Jane Smith and Mr. John Smith

    Source(s): Just and Old Crone
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