Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationAircraft · 1 decade ago

at what altitude cruise will the piot will then have the clearance to descend for an initial Approach via VFR?

Update:

actually the pilot is in an altitude flight level 270 and i said he's under VFR from departure to arrival and by the way he only made a made communication with the Aerospace Center for example I.e., Mactan Center on 118.2 and traffic is 3 o' clock 30 nautical miles away

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    You cannot be under VFR a flight level 270. All flight levels are only assigned to IFR flights. Keep in mind, there is a difference between the terms VFR or visual flight rules and VMC or visual meteorological conditions. If you were VMC on a VFR flight plan and you contacted ATC and they assigned you an altitude, you just accepted an IFR clearance. That basically is the difference between IFR and VFR; the acceptance of an assigned altitude.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Well in real life you can't do what you are talking about unless you get special permission from the FAA. You are not permitted to fly VFR at high altitudes. It is even really lower in some parts of the world with high density areas like the U.K it can be as low as 4000ft So if that was the case you are breaking aviation rules. A visual approach is legitimate IFR procedure. Usually commenced at 30DME when the pilot descends to the LSALT or MSA. He/She can then decide if the meteorological conditions permit a visual approach. The flight still remains an IFR flight unless the pilot calls ATC and requests to change to VFR category which is not always permitted depending on what sort of flight it is i.e.: Private, Charter, RPT

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You get the clearance at cruise altitude.....descend and maintain etc. All it is is directing traffic to accomodate each aircraft in the vicinity of an airport. Remember you're VFR so your initial approach is when you start to descend for your arriving airport. If you mean IFR and cleared to your Initial Approach fix, you can be cleared as far away and at any altitude if no traffic will be a factor at your ETA. However, it made me smile when others caught the fact that you cannot be VFR at FL270....not even VFR on top because you cannot be VFR on top in Class A.

  • 1 decade ago

    No one will fly FL 270 at VFR! Flights higher than FL180 must be IFR and have a flght plan filed. From there, ATC will take the plane from departure to approach based on the filed waypoints. It is a hand out system form one ATC center to the other.

    The altitude the pilot will be clared for for final approach will be determined by the location, how many other planes are flying in the area and the geography of the place.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Altitude is not that relevant for a clearance. It's your distance from the airport. As a general rule of thumb, you should be at at least 10,000ft 30 miles away from the airport. Because you use the word clearance, the airspace is controlled and most likely the pilot will only be able to descend when the controler gives him permission.

    In VFR flight under uncontrolled airspace, it's up to the pilot to when to descend. The exact number is determined by the aircraft's performance, weather and weight etc.

  • 1 decade ago

    The Initial Approach Altitude (IAA) is dictated by the respective airfields.

    You will seek clearance from ATC, once you are overhead, to descend down to the IAA from your cruising level.

    After reaching IAA, you will call the controller again and ask clearance for your descent and landing approach.

    Source(s): none
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    ...your question is missing some important elements... What altitude did the A.T.C. assign him...? and what is the traffic at a "particular" altitude... (and is he IFR and wanting to go to VFR...at a lower altitude ?)

  • 1 decade ago

    dont know. maybe 1,000 feet

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