Techie Apollo 14 question?

I know many changes were made to the CSM after Apollo 13, but here's one I am pondering: Did they make a change to the CO2 canisters so they would be interchangeable (after having to scramble to make the CM canisters work in the LM)? Or did they keep it the same and design a ready-made adapter for this purpose maybe??

9 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I don't know the answer but I understand your question.

    To help out others who may know, may I expand on your question by mentioning that the "canisters" you are referring to are the lithium hydroxide CO2 scrubbers.

    I'd like to know this answer too! I wonder what was done ... I sort of doubt that new, interchangeable canisters were designed, built and certified in time for Apollo 14 (or, for that matter, even before the Apollo program ended)

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    No, they did not redesign the lithium hydroxide canisters. That would have necessitated a total redesign of the air purification system, and would have been solving the wrong problem.

    The redesign they did carry out was effectively a simple case of moving the oxygen tanks to opposite sides of the service module and adapting the feedlines so that the loss of one tank would not damage the other. On Apollo 13 the explosion of one oxygen tank had damaged the feedlines from the other and allowed it to lose its oxygen to space as well. The oxygen on Apollo not only provided the atmosphere in the capsule it also provided one of the reactants for the fuel cells. These fuel cells combined oxygen and hydrogen to produce water and electricity. When the Apollo 13 CSM lost all its oxygen it also lost the ability to provide its own power. All it had left was the battery, and that would be needed for re-entry, when the service module was cut loose. For that reason it had to be powered down entirely, including the air purification system. The LM air circulation system was then the only system keeping the carbon dioxide levels down.

    The idea was that the redesign used from Apollo 14 onwards would prevent the total loss of CSM oxygen that necessitated the shutdown on Apollo 13. If the command module can be kept at least partially operational than the air filtration system can be kept on, so there is no need to jury-rig the LM system to take CSM LiOH canisters.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    I also wonder if they ever changed the design. You can check the reference, nice pictures of CSM and LM canisters. Also there is a picture of the adapted CSM one used in Apollo 13.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    I own an un-flown but flight ready lithium hydroxide scrubber sealed and dated 20th April 1972, four days after the launch of Apollo 16.

    It is identical to those used on 13 and weighs around 4kg.

    In general fifteen of these scrubbers were carried on each mission, two in use at any given time, and were on the check lists as a daily change item.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I don't think they changed the design at all.

    Source(s): I haven't a clue as to what I'm talking about. I just wanted to answer your question.
    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    ? ?

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I'm almost positive they DID change them to be interchangeable. That would have really made NASA look stupid to have the same thing happen again! At least they knew what to do if it did happen again - get the cardboard and the plastic and the tape, etc!

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Holden
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    They did redesign the oxy tank...

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    I don't think they made them interchangeble

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.