Does anybody know what does "hallyu" and "kabuki" mean?

I was just wondering what it meant...somebody tell me...

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  • Serena
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Hallyu-The Korean Wave

    Hallyu is a new term which some Korean marketing genius probably came up with in a boardroom somewhere. Hallyu was invented to increase tourism and raise the profile of Korea in the world.The term 'Hallyu' means the love for Korean pop culture, or the appreciation of all things Korean. Hallyu began roughly 5 years ago when the rest of Asia discovered Korean soap operas. One of the breakthrough dramas was a series called Winter Sonata starring Choi Ji Woo and Bae Young-Joon. After that, more Korean dramas saw their way to foreign shores and Korean films and music started to follow suit. Korean marketing people started to see a Korea-centric trend flowing throughout Asia Hawaii and even in parts of Russia. They dubbed this flow "The Korean Wave" or Hallyu.

    Kabuki is a traditional Japanese form of theater with its origins in the Edo period. Kabuki, in contrast to the older surviving Japanese art forms such as No, was the popular culture of the townspeople and not of the higher social classes.

    Kabuki plays are about historical events, moral conflicts in love relationships and the like. The actors use an old fashioned language which is difficult to understand even for some Japanese people. They speak in a monotonous voice and are accompanied by traditional Japanese instruments.

    The kabuki stage (kabuki no butai) is a rotating stage and is further equipped with several gadgets like trapdoors through which the actors can appear and disappear. Another specialty of the kabuki stage is a footbridge (hanamichi) that leads through the audience.

    In the early years, both, men and women acted in Kabuki plays. Later during the Edo period, the Tokugawa shogunate forbade the acting to women, a restriction that survives to the present day. Several male kabuki actors are, therefore, specialized in playing female roles (onnagata).

    The best place for tourists to see a kabuki play is in the Kabukiza Theater in the Ginza district in Tokyo, where it is possible to rent English headphones and see just one act of a play instead of sitting through a whole performance which not seldomly lasts more than three hours.

    Note that during kabuki plays, it is common for fans in the audience to shout the name of their favorite actor just in the right moment during short pauses.

  • 1 decade ago

    Hallyu the Korean wave refers to the recent surge of popularity of South Korean popular culture in other countries, especially in Asian countries.

    Kabuki is a form of traditional Japanese theatre. Kabuki theatre is known for the stylization of its drama and for the elaborate make-up worn by its performers

  • rash
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Korean Wave Hallyu

  • 1 decade ago

    The Korean wave refers to the recent surge of popularity of South Korean popular culture in other countries, especially in Asian countries.

    It is also referred to as "Hallyu", from the Korean pronunciation of the term. The term was coined in China in mid 1999 by Beijing journalists startled by the growing popularity of South Koreans and South Korean goods in China.[1] 한류/韓流/韩流 (Korean Wave) is homophone to an existing compound word, 한류/寒流 ("cold current") in Mandarin Chinese and Korean.

    The Korean wave began with the export of Korean TV dramas such as Jewel in the Palace and Winter Sonata across East and Southeast Asia; the growing success of Korean drama was shortly matched in the fields of movies and popular music.

    AND

    Kabuki (歌舞伎, kabuki?) is a form of traditional Japanese theatre. Kabuki theatre is known for the stylization of its drama and for the elaborate make-up worn by its performers. The individual kanji characters, from left to right, mean sing (歌), dance (舞), and skill (伎). Kabuki is therefore sometimes translated as "the art of singing and dancing." These are, however, ateji, characters that do not reflect actual etymology. The word kabuki is believed to derive from the verb kabuku, meaning "to lean" or "to be out of the ordinary", so kabuki can be interpreted to mean "avant-garde" or "bizarre" theatre.[1] The expression kabukimono (歌舞伎者) referred originally to wild urban gangs of young eccentrics who dressed outrageously and had strange hairstyles.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I know kabuki is a sort of Japanese traditional theatre

  • 1 decade ago

    kabuki

    to be out of the ordinary", so kabuki can be interpreted to mean "avant-garde" or "bizarre"

    hallyu

    Korean wave

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

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    Does anybody know what does "hallyu" and "kabuki" mean?

    I was just wondering what it meant...somebody tell me...

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

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