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which is harder stainless Steel or mild Steel. Hoping to get the materials properties for this two metal.?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    As Kelley Anne indicated, we would need to know exactly which kind of stainless steel you mean. There are martensitic and precipitation-hardening stainless steels that are much harder than any mild steel, and there are austenitic stainless steels that can be harder /or/ softer than most mild steels, depending on the degree of cold work imparted to them.

    Also, although mild steels are neither strictly nor universally defined, the term "mild steel" conventionally refers to hot-rolled or normalized plain-carbon or C-Mn steels containing between roughly 0.15% and 0.3% C. The hardness range within this classification isn't as broad as that of all stainless steels, but there can still be significant variation.

    To give you an analogy, your question is sort of like asking, "Which tastes better, Chinese food or Japanese food?" Too general to be answered directly.

    *** EDIT ***

    ruggerjvd: 1250 Brinell hardness? I don't think so. That's way off the chart, and no stainless ever dreamt of being that hard. And 120 HB is much too soft for a typical mild steel.

    *** REPLY to ruggerjvd ***

    Yeah, that table on Wiki appears to have some issues.

    Ni-Hard is essentially a highly-alloyed white cast iron, with so-called "massive" primary carbides embedded in a martensitic matrix. It can certainly be 600 HB, as it needs to be for superior wear resistance, and it's still on the same Brinell scale as the others. Mild steels (as defined above) and annealed austenitic stainless steels could both be in the neighborhood of 120-140 HB (I misspoke previously), although they're usually produced at significantly higher values.

    Source(s): Answerer is a metallurgical engineer. Try this site: http://www.matweb.com
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  • pelt
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Stainless Steel Hardness Scale

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  • Shelly
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Most Stainless Steel is harder than Mild Steel. The most common three types of mild steel: hot roll, cold roll, and stress proof. These types are shaped when hot or cold. Stress proof is usually used for shafting and is heat treated cold roll. Cold roll is a little harder than hot roll, and stress proof is a little harder than cold roll (but only on the surface of the material). Stainless steel's hardness ranges from a lot softer than hot roll to a lot harder than stress proof, but most of the time, stainless is a little harder than mild.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Stainless, which is alloyed with chromium to resist rust & corrosion. Then hot forged, cold rolled, then mild steel. All of these can be alloyed (meaning mixed as molten metals, blended together) to get desired hardness or certain other qualities and properties. Mild steel is malleble (easy to form into shapes) then hardened with heat and then chilled with water or oil to keep that shape to the Rockwell scale ( industrial standard for measuring hardness) desired hardness.

    Source(s): Materials handling
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There are so many different kinds. About the weakest stainless steel I could find has a yield strength of 29,700 psi.

    About the softest steel I could find, although some may be softer had a yield strength 30,000 psi.

    Unless they are very close in strength, a good way of telling would be to see if you could scratch one with the other. Whichever scratches the other is the hardest.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Hardness is determined by the Brinnell hardness scale. Mild Steel has an HB of 120, while SS has a value of 1250, much harder. You can read more here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brinell_hardness_test

    ******

    Hi easy prof, thanks for the update. So much for Wikipedia.

    But we typically spec pump impellers with Ni-hard with 600 BHN. Are these different scales?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Stainless steel, Anyone knows that, Just try cutting one with the other and see which one works.

    Got any harder questions

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