How the pilots flare the aircraft just before touchdown?

I presume they use the elevators, Correct me if I'm wrong!

14 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes it is the elevator, but thats very simply put. You also must use rudder to keep the plane straight just before touchdown.

    The easiest way to think of the flare is to not landing the airplane. In other words you fly over the runway with idle power and try to keep flying and not land the plane. Obviously as the plane loses speed you must keep pulling up on the controls to keep the plane afloat, thus flaring. At some point the plane will no longer fly and will gently touchdown, well hopefully if you judge it right and are only a few feet off the ground. When I first started learning I can remember some big drops.....

  • fitman
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    It depends on the aircraft. When I land a boeing 767, I cross the threshold on speed and on glidepath with the aircraft trimmed. I then start flaring around 40 ft and I reduce the power at touchdown.

    With an aircraft like a T-38 (which I have flown), a good technique is to maintain a 4 degree glide path and aim 450 feet short of the threshold. At about 1000 feet prior to the runway , you gradually start your roundout but you do not pull power until just prior to the threshold.

    Pilots who have to dead stick high performance aircraft (i.e. Space Shuttle) often maintain over 15 degree glide paths and aim a couple of miles short of the runway. They usually start their roundout at over 1000 feet above runway elevation.

    Generally, the steeper the glidepath, the farther short of the runway they aim, the more speed they maintain (compared to touchdown speed), and the higher they start their roundout.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    If you're stablized on speed and on glideslope with flaps full down in either our 727 or the Gulfstream, no flare is required. You will be in the landing attitude for the last few miles. This is what we call a "stablized approach" and we always use this procedure for the final thousand feet. If we are not stablized with gear down, full flaps, on glideslope, on course and on speed by five hundred feet, we go around no matter the weather. In the simulator we even practice zero visibility landings just for the hell of it. You simply fly the ILS as I've stated above and when you feel the mains hit, idle the throttles, deploy the speed brakes and get on the binders. Its a little firm on touchdown but it works great.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes they use the elevators but it is combination of reducing power and applying back pressure with the elevators to bring the aircraft safely back to the ground.

    The very important point is that your EYES should be fixed in the far distance beyond the far end of the runway at all times when landing the plane.

    The minute you look down at the touch down point you will muck up your landings.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes. By use of the elevators. During the approach, you keep a bit of power, crossing the numbers or just before, assume a nose up attitude by applying back pressure, and slowly take off the power. Let the aircraft just slow down and touch down on its own.

  • ZKSUJ
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Trick is, have the aircraft trimmed when over the threshold so in theory you can leave the controls and it would continue its profile, then all you need is a little back pressure to arrest the sink rate and flare.

    Yes, it is with Elevator

  • 1 decade ago

    When I flew 737s, if your speed is smack-on V ref+5 and my power setting is right, I'll idle my thrust at around 30ft and gently apply positive pressure on the elevator just about 5ft. But most of the time I'd have to chop the throttle at around 10ft and just flare after that.

    Now flying planes made from the other side of the Atlantic, they seems to hate gliding above runway with idle power, I always have to retard the thrust just before flare, about 5ft.

  • 1 decade ago

    Yes they use the elevators (a wee bit back on the controls) while on the runway thresh hold just prior to touch down.

  • 1 decade ago

    yea we use them. also a little trim. we come in slow then pull up about 100 feet away from the runway. if were coming in slow then were also still descending thus its a nice smoothing landing. but you must come in slow your 1 you will pul up or 2 you'll have a hard one

    Source(s): thats me
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    yea we use them. also a little trim. we come in slow then pull up about 100 feet away from the runway. if were coming in slow then were also still descending thus its a nice smoothing landing. but you must come in slow your 1 you will pul up or 2 you'll have a hard one.

    Source(s): AA pilot
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