Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 1 decade ago

Buying a dog from previous owner, need advice?

This will be my first ever dog. Will it try to bite me and be aggressive because it is not used to me? How do I let it get used to me.

14 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Have you been around dogs before? Why would you believe a dog would automatically be agressive to you our bite?

    First of all, before getting this dog, you should really research the breed some more. All breeds have characteristics that are common to that breed - it's why some people have favorite breeds and own only one or two kinds of dogs.

    You also want to know more about the breed so you can decide and be sure that this particular dog will fit your home and lifestyle.

    For instance, if you don't spend much time at home and think the dog will spend the majority of time outside in a kennel, then you shouldn't get a Chihuahua or even a Great Dane. Both are short haired breeds that don't tolerate extreme temperatures very well. Both are also relatively "needy" breeds that need to be in the house with their families because they are emotionally attached to humans and don't do well without that daily, constant contact.

    If you have little children who like to run and scream, you probably don't want a herding breed like an Australian Shepherd or Sheltie - both of which would chase your children, nip at their heels, and possibly knock them down. This is what they were bred to do (with sheep), and it is instinctual to chase and try to herd running beings!

    You can go to the AKC website - www.akc.org - and learn more about all sorts of breeds and the characteristics, both behavioral and physical, that might better help you determine if this particular dog would fit your home.

    You should also talk to this owner a lot. Find out why they are giving the dog up. Go VISIT the dog before agreeing to take it. Ask to see it's vet records. Ask if it's had any training (obedience classes - I recommend a beginning obedience class for ANYONE who gets a new dog - so that you two can bond and learn more about each other AND learn to train your dog to behave).

    After you've visited the dog, go home and think about it. Decide if you have the time and the money to care for the dog properly. Will he be alone for more than 10 hours at a time? Then don't get the dog. Do you have enough $$ saved up so that if your dog becomes seriously ill, you can take it to the vet? If not, don't get the dog. Can you afford an average of $100 a month to feed, care for, and otherwise keep the dog? Then don't the dog.

    And we haven't even gotten into behavioral issues yet!

    But seriously, many dogs will be cautious around new people. That's not unrealistic. But I would NEVER take a dog that tried to bite me or was aggressive.

    Good luck!

  • Jan S
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    As a novice owner, you need to ensure you are getting a sensible people proof dog. An adult dog is fine, but you will need to find out its routine and preferences from the owner. The dog will probably be upset at losing its human friend, and will pine for a week or three. Keep it well exercised during this time. Why is the owner selling it - seems and odd thing to do?

    You need to do some research on the net or get a book on dog behaviour and care - before you take on the dog. Make sure you know how much it's going to cost in time, effort and hard cash [vets are expensive]. I think if it's possible you need to spend a couple of weeks getting to know the dog and taking it out with its present owner. Then the break will be less traumatic for the dog and you will have got to know each other.

    No, a nice dog will not be aggressive towards you - if it is, look for another one. Pls don't be in a hurry, be a responsible owner - a dog is for life. Good luck

  • 1 decade ago

    Eyota just posted this but because its such good info, reading it twice wont hurt:

    Have you been around dogs before? Why would you believe a dog would automatically be agressive to you our bite?

    First of all, before getting this dog, you should really research the breed some more. All breeds have characteristics that are common to that breed - it's why some people have favorite breeds and own only one or two kinds of dogs.

    You also want to know more about the breed so you can decide and be sure that this particular dog will fit your home and lifestyle.

    For instance, if you don't spend much time at home and think the dog will spend the majority of time outside in a kennel, then you shouldn't get a Chihuahua or even a Great Dane. Both are short haired breeds that don't tolerate extreme temperatures very well. Both are also relatively "needy" breeds that need to be in the house with their families because they are emotionally attached to humans and don't do well without that daily, constant contact.

    If you have little children who like to run and scream, you probably don't want a herding breed like an Australian Shepherd or Sheltie - both of which would chase your children, nip at their heels, and possibly knock them down. This is what they were bred to do (with sheep), and it is instinctual to chase and try to herd running beings!

    You can go to the AKC website - www.akc.org - and learn more about all sorts of breeds and the characteristics, both behavioral and physical, that might better help you determine if this particular dog would fit your home.

    You should also talk to this owner a lot. Find out why they are giving the dog up. Go VISIT the dog before agreeing to take it. Ask to see it's vet records. Ask if it's had any training (obedience classes - I recommend a beginning obedience class for ANYONE who gets a new dog - so that you two can bond and learn more about each other AND learn to train your dog to behave).

    After you've visited the dog, go home and think about it. Decide if you have the time and the money to care for the dog properly. Will he be alone for more than 10 hours at a time? Then don't get the dog. Do you have enough $$ saved up so that if your dog becomes seriously ill, you can take it to the vet? If not, don't get the dog. Can you afford an average of $100 a month to feed, care for, and otherwise keep the dog? Then don't the dog.

    And we haven't even gotten into behavioral issues yet!

    But seriously, many dogs will be cautious around new people. That's not unrealistic. But I would NEVER take a dog that tried to bite me or was aggressive.

    Good luck!

  • Collie
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Dig into this quite a bit. Why is the owner getting rid of the dog? Has there been a complaint of aggression made against the dog and are the Police involved? Does he have to get rid of the dog? The price that you pay should not be much as you are doing them a favour! Is the Dog Microchipped, Inoculated? Does it have papers proving the the seller actually owns the dog? (Lots of dogs are being stolen in UK.) Which vet does the owner use. (A follow up visit there may be worth while!)

    If you have any doubts what so ever about the legality of ownership, then opt out and get a dog from a Rescue!

    Source(s): 45 years experience
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    First of all, it would be best to get to know the dog even before buying it and get all the information you can about caring for a dog. As you have never had a dog, there is much you should know.

    Please learn all you can as quickly as you can so that you can minimize risk of problems and deal quickly and effectively with any that should show up.

    And given by the way you worded your question, be totally sure you actually want this dog. A relationship like this is a lifetime committment, for the life of the dog. Be sure that you are prepared to do what it takes or you will be doing the dog more harm than good.

  • 1 decade ago

    You cannot be nervous around a dog. That in itself can cause a fear bite from some animals.

    I also would worry about why someone is selling their dog. Before even considering it, I would want a hearworm test done on the dog. I would like to see vet records to ensure that the dog does not have an illness that could end up costing you a whole lot of money.

  • 1 decade ago

    What sort of dog is it?

    Most dogs are nervous when brought into a new environment so if I were you I'd just leave the dog to get used to everything. Don't go making huge fusses of it when you bring it home etc but let it come to you.

    At mealtimes and walktimes just do it calmly & talk soothingly to it. If you are buying from a reputable owner then they will usually give you a list of the dogs likes and dislikes & routine. If you want to change anything then do it gradually.

    Most dogs usually show agression only out of fear. If you are scared of the dog already I would suggest you rethink & maybe get a cat!!!!

    Source(s): Have lived with dogs all my life, am owned by two & help with rescues.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Would have been good to know the breed.

    Most dogs take around three - four days to adjust but dogs are pack animals and in the wild the pack changes all the time. They are not like humans they accept change very well. They will mourn the loss of the other owner for a few days but after that they will be fine with you

  • 1 decade ago

    Ask yourself one question first. Why is the previous owner selling the dog ? From my point of view, if I owned a dog and had to find another owner for whichever reason, I would be willing to give it away to the best person I feel would give it love. I am always very sceptical about people 'selling' their animals. As to your question. Dogs adapt very well to people who show them love and affection, unless of course they are vicious and aggressive in the first place. In this case, you would need to take the dog for dog training classes to get it re-educated.

  • 1 decade ago

    Pay a visit and socialize with the dog, see if the dog fancies you and vice versa.

    Having a dog is a lifetime committment. So make sure you read as much as you can on dog ownership before committing to one. Commit to it only when you are ready and not on impulse.

    Ask the owner some questions

    e.g. Why are you giving him up, what are his favourite activities,etc.

    Read about the breed as much as you can on the internet to make sure you can commit to the breed's needs and demand. e.g. long haired coat need more time to groom then a short haired dog. Active dogs needs more exercises/games then a dog that is sedantry.

    Source(s): Get tips of dog care at http://www.dogcarezone.com
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