tegra977 asked in SportsCycling · 1 decade ago

Which size fork?

I have a 52cm Cannondale and wanted to replace the fork. Is there different fork sizes? If so which size would I need? Also is a fork that's threaded only for quill stems and threadless forks are for threadless stems? thanks

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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    Road bike I assume...

    Threaded = quill or with adaptor threadless

    Threadless = threadless only

    My 'Dale is a 52cm too, 2002 with a 1 1/8 threadless steerer tube. I bought a new carbon fork for it.

    Here's what you need to know...

    threadless:

    1. steerer tube length from crown to end... must be long enough to fit through frame with bearings installed, stem stack height and any spacers you want to raise the stem to your desired height. Too short - you lose, too long cut it to fit.

    2. Steerer dia. 1", 1 1/8" or 1 1/4". Most bikes now are 1 1/8, but many older bikes are 1".

    3. Integrated crown designed to match up to the bike's head tube for looks generally. A non-integrated fork will fit on a integrated head tube bike (just will look crappy) The other way around it may bind.

    4. Rake - how much forward the forks slope to put it simply. Most are 43 degrees I believe.

    5. Wheel size - 26", 27", 700c, 650c. Forks are made to fit certain sizes.

    My R2000 now has a Easton EC90 SLX integrated 1 1/8" 43c rake fork. My old Trek 2100 has a 1" threaded fork. I bought a threadless adaptor from Nashbar for $10 and used a threadless stem on it. I like theadless over quill because they look better, easier to change out and mose flexable - turn it upside down for higher bars etc.

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  • 1 decade ago

    to begin if you have a threaded fork, which i take it you do, it is easiest to replace with another threaded fork. i assume you want to change from an aluminum to carbon? yes, there are different lengths of steer tubes (the part with the threads on it) you need to buy one that fits your frame. i suggest measuring the one that you have and getting the closest one to it. a little longer (1-2cm) is okay because you can make up that with spacers. then it is simply a matter of knocking off the crown race and swapping everything.

    now to change from threaded to threadless becomes harder. the old threaded ones were 1" and you will need to stick with a threadless fork that is 1" diameter. you will need to get a threadless headset, spacer kit, a saw guide or tubing cutter, a new threadless stem and handle bar (they are bigger around, chances are your old wont work), and no you can't really mix the two technologies very well.

    then you will need to know where you want your stem and bars to be, and add spacers to place it where you want it. i would error on the side of too high, because you can always cut more off later, and you can't add it back on if you position the bars too low. you use a saw guide and a hack saw or tubing cutter to make a good square cut. then you simply install the headset races, bearings, spacers and stem. mistakes can be very costly. i suggest if you arent sure about it, have a pro or someone that knows do it. you are better off paying someone than having to throw away a very expensive upgrade.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Cannondale forks are a bit weird, in that the company has experimented with mono shocks, either as single fork or integrated as a unit just under the lower bearing. This makes replacement forks tricky. Most early Cannondales allow for about 75 cm travel on their XC models. I would look at 80 - 100 as replacement.

    Really need the model and year to give a clearer answer. I assume that you are after a lighter/smoother ride - Fox or Mazzochi? Check with your local bike shop first as these are expensive items.

    Luck

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  • 1 decade ago

    well most forks come in sizes depending in what you want suspension forks are measured by the travel they have meaning how much they can compress if you have a freeride or dh bike you can go from 170 mm to 200 mm of travel if you have a hardtail bike you could go with a 100 mm to 155mmmost forks now come standard for threadless stems and headtubes if you have a threaded fork or stem or evebn the headtube of your bike your autdated and you probably wouldnt be here so yeah other regular forks without suspension are meant for street riding or for roadbiking!!!!!

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  • 1 decade ago

    idk about the last part but, why do you want to replace the fork? If it is a weird awnser don't replace it, also Why ask for size when there is no telling what fork it is(salad, dining)

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    i would recommend u bring the bike to a sports shop

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