? asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 decade ago

why were the paxon boy important to history?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    About 57 drunken rangers from Paxton, Pa., slaughtered 20 innocent and defenseless Conestoga Indians near Lancaster, Pa. Governor John Penn thereupon issued proclamations ordering the local magistrates to arrest and try those men involved in the massacre. Since the residents of that frontier area were sympathetic to the actions of the Paxton Boys, however, no prosecutions were undertaken.

    Besides revealing the prevailing bias of frontiersmen against Indians, the Paxton Boys uprising also took on a political tone. Residents of the Pennsylvania backcountry were already embittered over the eastern counties' disproportionate control over the colony's legislature and the failure of the eastern-dominated legislature to provide adequate appropriations for defense of the frontier. Consequently, sparked by the events surrounding the Paxton Boys massacre, about 600 armed frontiersmen marched on Philadelphia in January 1764 to vent their anger against the provincial assembly. A delegation of prominent Philadelphians, including Benjamin Franklin, met the protesters and restrained them from entering the city by promising them that the legislature would provide a thorough hearing of their complaints. The assembly offered no redress for the protesters' main grievances, though, and the colony's Proprietary Party publicized the incident to their advantage in their campaign during the election of 1764.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I think you meant the "Paxton Boys". They played an interesting role in the early struggle over the role of the government in defending citizens of the nation, and in the definition of citizenship. Check out the link below.

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  • 1 decade ago

    No such person(s) existed.

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