Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

Why did Gautama Buddha reject Hinduisim?

Was it the cast system or something else?

Update:

and is it Gautama or Siddartha? I keep coming across different names.

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  • 1 decade ago
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    The caste system. His own mystical experience and experiments with asceticism. The enlightenment that he claims to have received through meditation.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Budda reject Hinuisim because he found the system of their religious beliefs and practices and experiences and modes of expression is vital to human survival and self understanding .The way the Hindu did self-imposed constraints beliveing that it woujld bring them greater freedom in various areas of their lives, such as increased clarity of thought and the ability to resist potentially destructive temptations he found them to be completely ineffective. This was one of the main reasons along with others. So yes it was the cast system was the biggest issue for him but others did follow.

    Siddhārtha Gautama was his name also known as Ezekiel in the old testment or יחזקאל, Yehezkel,ذو الكفل,Dhū'l-Kifl.

    It must be understood that Hinduism and Buddhism have been sharing the same culture for the last 2500 years, which means they share a common language (Sanskrit or Pali). Because of this historical situation there are many words used commonly by both which have led many scholars (especially Hindu scholar) to think that they mean exactly the same thing in Buddhism as in Hinduism, By extending this thinking, one arrives at the wrong conclusion that Buddhism is another form or revision or reformation of Hinduism.

    First of all, it is wrong to say that Buddhism is either a branch or a formation of Hinduism, Buddhism is actually a paradigm shift from not only Hinduism but also all other religious systems. Secondly, words used commonly in both Hinduism and Buddhism do not mean the same thing, in fact very often they mean almost the opposite and certainly at all times they point at two different paradigms. Hinduism actually apperars to arrise after Buddhism. Because of the fact he traveled over northern India does not make it so. The Buddha was born in a Hindu family, just as Christ was born in a Jewish family.

    Some people still argue that Buddhism was an offshoot of Hinduism and the Buddha was a part of the Hindu pantheon, a view which is not acceptable to many Buddhists. It is however widely accepted that Buddhism gained popularity in India because it released the people from the oppression of tradition and orthodoxy. So because of the popluarity of Buddhism Hinduism clamed that this was so.. Infact you see that it is still very deep in most teachings about this.

    As always,

    Seek,Learn,Discover,Love,

    Your Sister In Christ

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  • 1 decade ago

    The names may change, much like the mind changes.

    Buddha realized mans mind must be calmed, before man can understand any of the higher truths. Buddha realized a religion could not accomplish this, and opted for a simpler system, called a philosophy! This philosophy will help one see the truth and falsehood within an ever changing world.

    This philosophy will allow man to independently address and understand why man is so caught up in the world and its enticements.

    What man does with this knowledge and how he or she applies it, is up to each human.

    May each human reach for the "Truths" that are in the heart of man, and come to realize that "God" is alive and loves all of mankind!

    Source(s): so says a small insignificant Sufi student........
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  • 1 decade ago

    It was Sidhartha Gautama (spelled variously), and the reason he gave up the luxuries of his princely upbringing was to seek an answer to his perception of suffering in the world. After spending a great deal of time in contemplation, he was not satisfied with Hinduism in its dealing with the cessation of suffering of all beings. I would not say he "rejected Hinduism" so much as he "sought full enlightenment".

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  • 1 decade ago

    i think it was because he wanted the answers to questions that hinduism couldn't give. i haven't heard him refered to as Gautama, only as Siddartha.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No, not really. His view is all sentient beings are the same. The brahamians does not buy into that as this will mean they are of the same Chaste class as the untouchable.

    He did not actually rejected hinduisim, hinduisim rejected him.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Dear your question shows that you dont know anything about Buddha and hinduism both.

    Buddhism is an offshoot of hinduism, and nowhere Buddha rejected hinduism

    These ignorant people writing abt caste do not know that Siddhartha was a prince, a high caste Kshatriya.

    He left his palace as he could not see an ill person, an old and a dead so he wished to find way out of miseries of world

    AUM is a sacred world in buddhism as it is in hinduism. your ignorance can not twist the Truth

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Nowhere in the story of Siddhartha do I remember him rejecting Hinduism.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Bcoz he got enlightenment.

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  • 1 decade ago

    This is just another classic tale of a man who got tired of what he disagreed with so he went off and created his own false teaching and following.

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