Why is our moon so cold without any atmosphere ,but the earth gets warmer as we lose ours?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The earth is not getting warmer as we are losing ours. The problem about "losing our atmosphere" is the ozone going away which is giving out more UV rays. There is no proven evidence that supports the world is actually getting warmer from the gases that we our putting into the air, but that is what is said to be warming up earth's climate is because we are lining our atmosphere with more gas. Of course this might not have anything to do with it and it could be all natural.. which i doubt in my opinion.

  • 5 years ago

    The last two winters being cold in two areas of the world does not mean the planet overall is getting colder. Global warming deals with how much energy is trapped in the troposphere. Once that energy is in the troposphere it can be redirected wherever it pleases. However that energy is still there, it does not disappear. Various effects in the troposphere can change and redistribute that energy elsewhere. This means that, while some areas may get colder, other areas will get warmer as more energy is added to that ear. An example would be these last couple winters. While it was cold in the USA and Europe the Arctic and Greenland were experiencing exceptionally warm temperatures for this time of year because the energy that was displaced from the USA and Europe went over those areas. Nighthawk: Mr Jones stated that the warming since 1995 had been 0.12C. What he stated was that this was just shy of the 95% confidence level in that it was not due to noise. You keep stating the same thing over and over again in a round about way and you are still wrong. Screaming Sun: Most of 2010 was dominated by an El Nino. This is one of the few reasons why 2010 was so warm. It is by no means as strong as the El Nino during 1997/1998 but the temperatures of the two periods are statistically tied. The last few months and the beginning of 2011 is being dominated by a La Nina.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    You are misinformed, perhaps by anti-global warming propaganda.

    Temperatures on the Moon vary from colder than the Earth to warmer than the Earth. The lack of an atmosphere allows huge swings, and the average temperature is about 60 C colder than the Earth because there is no greenhouse effect.

    There is, of course a greenhouse effect on the Earth, and the "natural" greenhouse effect is critical to maintaining the Earth at a good temperature. The problem with burning fossil fuels is that this adds extra greenhouse gasses to the Earth's atmosphere, which will cause dangerously high temperatures in the future. It's the gasses we are adding to the Earth's atmosphere that are the problem.

  • 1 decade ago

    Firstly, the Earth is not losing its atmosphere.

    Second, the moon is cold when it is in the dark since it does not have an atmosphere to regulate the heat, and blistering hot when it is in direct sunshine (again, the absence of atmosphere makes it harsher).

    Follow the link, it will confirm that the mean day temperature on the moon is 107 C while night is -153 C.

    This would be the case of earth as well if we did not have the atmosphe which acts as a regulator, reducing the differences and allowing the heat to propagate and dissipate though winds, but also keeps more heat in, allowing the planet to be warmer that it would be otherwise.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Space is naturally cold. The moon doesn't have any atmosphere to keep the heat in so it is exposed to space. Where the moon faces the sun it's hot. The earths atmosphere is made up of gases that keep the earth warm, but these gases are increasing. Like a boiling pot with the cover on, the gases keep building up faster then they can get out. The higher the pressure the more escapes even though the pot (earth) is getting hotter.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Actually, we are not warming because we're losing atmosphere. Our atmosphere has the same volume of gases that it did for the last several million years or so. The atmosphere is warming because a lot of carbon dioxide gas, which had been stored in underground oil and coal, has recently (within the last hundred years or so) been released into the air. When that happens, the sun's heat is absorbed by carbon dioxide (it likes to soak up heat) instead of being bounced back into space.

    Think of carbon dioxide as a pair of gloves that you put on your cold hands. Your body's heat does not just flow out into the air as fast as it did. Instead, it gets trapped by the gloves and warms up your skin.

  • 1 decade ago

    The atmosphere of a planet retains any heat it receives. The heat energy is "stored" in the air molecules. The moon has none, so only its surface experiences temperature changes.

    I wasn't aware that Earth was losing any significant percentage of its atmosphere. Our atmosphere is constantly being replenished by Earth's forests and out-gassing from volcanos. Our atmosphere's chemical makeup *is* changing because of our civilization pumping crud into it, and that in turn is accelerating global warming.

  • 1 decade ago

    The moon isn't always cold. Only the side away from the sun. The lit up side is much hotter. I think there is like a 400 degree difference from the light side to the cold side. No atmosphere equals no way to maintain any normal temperature

  • 1 decade ago

    The atmosphere acts both as a shield and an insulator. The lack of atmosphere on the moon does not allow for the surface of the moon to retain the heat of the sun. The atmosphere of the earth will only allow sufficient heat through it to maintain our normal temps on earth. As we slowly lose our atmosphere we now are not able to get the full protection from the heat of the suns rays thus higher temps will occur.

  • eri
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    We're not really losing ours; it's the composition that changes. Greenhouse gases, like ozone and carbon dioxide, act as a one-way barrier against sunlight getting out - so it's trapped in the atmosphere, heating the Earth. Some greenhouse gases occur naturally, and others are the result of burning fossil fuels.

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