all_but_8 asked in HealthDental · 1 decade ago

OSHA Fee for Dentist Visit?

I got my dental bill and noticed three OSHA fee line items for $5 each. What is an OSHA fee and what is the frequency that a dentist can charge this?

Update:

Nebula D - you've obviously misconstrued the tone of my question as "bitching"; I was asking a simple question. Answer my question for what it is, back off, and don't be so defensive.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    OSHA is Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Basically they enforce health and safety guidelines for most working environments. Most dentists don't charge the fee. However some choose to as a way to bring in extra money. You will probably be charged the fee at most of you appointments. It is just a way to help cover the costs of keeping to OSHA regulations.

    Source(s): dental assistant
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I'm a dentist.

    Have you ever had the tires on your car replaced? If you have, you'd have noticed that your bill had something on it called a "disposal fee", or perhaps even an "environmental fee" on it.

    If the doctor feels that he is providing a service for you, directly or indirectly, that costs him money, he is justified in charging you for it. Simple as that.

    Let me ask you this question, while we're on the subject of fees: did your doctor charge you for numbing your tooth? He didn't, did he.

    When a woman gets an epidural, the fee for it can top $2000. There are indeed some women who opt to give birth without it.

    When your dentist, on the other hand, numbs your tooth, he has to do it for free. He pays for the syringes. He pays for the needles. He pays an arm and a leg for the anethesia medications. So, why isn't he allowed to charge you for the anesthesia?

    There's no law that says that a filling can't be done without anesthesia.

    Instead of bitching about the $5 OSHA fee, be thankful that dental professionals continue to compete with eachother for patients rather than wisen up, work together, and cooperatively agree that anesthesia is a service for which we should charge a fee.

    $35 for mandibular nerve block sounds like a very, very reasonable and justifiable fee.

    Do you know how many mandibular nerve blocks on average I provide (at no charge whatsoever) in a day? No less than ten. That would be an additional $350 worth of revenue coming into my practice each day. That's an additional $7000 per month, or an additional $84,000 a year.

    $20 for an infiltration injection sounds reasonable too.

    I'd say I give about 15 of those a day. That's $300 a day, multiplied by 20 work days a month, multiplied by twelve months a year = $72000

    So, add the two, and that's $156,000 worth of revenue we just give to you, our patients, for free.

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  • 1 decade ago

    If you are in the USA, there is no such fee. OSHA does not collect fees from anyone (with rare exceptions). If you are in another country, it may be a disposal fee they are allowed to charge for the disposal of mercury fillings, gold crown parts, and other chemicals.

    I don't know of another meaning for OSHA, but the OSHA may not be any of the safety agencies. It may be a special dentist acronym. Bottom line, call and ask. They will be the experts since they put it on the bill.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I scored a thumbs up for the other two. They are right. There is no employer "OSHA" fee that is being passed on to the consumer - other than normal state and/or federal payroll taxes.

    OSHA may be an acronym for something else, or it may be a not-so-clever way of charging extra and making you mad that "OSHA" made me pay more.

    I'd have a conversation about that with your dentist.

    Source(s): Work experience.
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  • 1 decade ago

    That dentist that answered your question needs to cool off,he must have lost a game of golf,anyway everyone else is right OSHA does require them to dispose of bloody items in a certain way and they are charged for this.

    (Many blessings)

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  • 4 years ago

    I am a patient. I feel safe to pay $5 to know that the facility is as per OSHA guidelines.

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  • 1 decade ago

    it sounds like a phony charge to me...

    osha is an acronym for the occupational safety and health administration, they are guidelines to protect employees and patients from hazards, contamination. The dentist should not charge you for keeping you safe and not infecting you with diseases. I would call and question it.

    Source(s): dental assistant
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  • B
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    I suspect it's a fee associated with the disposal of Bio-related waste (e.g., blood soaked gauze.)

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  • 4 years ago

    This is one more way to pad the bills for dentists.

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