The Quaran refers to buddha as a prophet. Does this mean muslims should account fo Buddha as a prophet?

However, muslims believe that over the years the religion of Buddhism,Judaism and christianity have been corrupted by man and hence islam has distend itself from these faiths. Doesn't this illustrate islam as a universal religion?
Update: In the list of prophets who are specifically mentioned, there are certain names which do not seem to belong to the prophets of Israel. Many commentators therefore are inclined to believe that they are non-Arab prophets who are included in the list just for the sake of representation of the outer world. For... show more In the list of prophets who are specifically mentioned, there are certain names which do not seem to belong to the prophets of Israel. Many commentators therefore are inclined to believe that they are non-Arab prophets who are included in the list just for the sake of representation of the outer world. For instance, Dhul-Kifl is one name in the list of prophets which is unheard of in the Arab or Semitic references. Some scholars seem to have traced this name to Buddha, who was of Kapeel, which was the capital of a small state situated on the border of India and Nepal. Buddha not only belonged to Kapeel, but was many a time referred to as being 'Of Kapeel'. This is exactly what is meant by the word 'Dhul-Kifl'. It should be remembered that the consonant 'p' is not present in Arabic, and the nearest one to it is 'fa'. Hence, Kapeel transliterated into Arabic becomes Kifl.

Apart from the evidence of the Quran, there is one reference which is controversial among the commentators.
Update 2: There is a tradition reported from the Holy Prophet (sa) which speaks of an Indian prophet by name. In his words: There was a prophet of God in India who was dark in colour and his name was Kahan.1 Now anyone acquainted with the history of Indian religions would immediately connect this description to... show more There is a tradition reported from the Holy Prophet (sa) which speaks of an Indian prophet by name. In his words:



There was a prophet of God in India who was dark in colour and his name was Kahan.1

Now anyone acquainted with the history of Indian religions would immediately connect this description to Lord Krishna, who is invariably described in the Hindu literature as being dark of complexion. Also, the title Kanhaya is added to his name Krishna. Kanhaya contains the same consonants K,N,H as does the name Kahan -- in no way an insignificant similarity. But whether any non-Arab prophet was mentioned by name or not is only an academic discussion. There is no denying the fact that the Holy Quran makes it incumbent on every Muslim not only to believe in all the prophets, but it also clearly informs us that in every region of the world and in every age, God did raise messengers and prophets.

THIS IS NOT FROM ME, I JUST CAME ACROSS THIS AND WAS SUPRISED AND CAME TO SHARE IT.
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