Hiddenmillionaires.com A Scam?

My grandmother went to the hiddenmillionaires.com conference as advertised on television. I have a funny feeling that the conference targets retirees/older people who are prone to get rich schemes presented by confidence men. Basically, what I would like to know is

a) Does anyone have any experience with this money making program?

b) Why would someone sell their highly lucrative strategy if the market wasn't already saturated?

c) Is there a non-compete clause in the contract, assuming that a contract even exists in the first place?

d) She said that the up-front cost is 4k. If the up-front costs exceed 4k, is it possible to make that money back in a reasonable time?

Basically, I want to make sure that this isn't an "I get rich at your expense" investment as usually people who create infomercials set this as their ultimate goal. I went to their website www.hiddenmillionaires.com and there wasn't much to be found aside from spelling and grammatical errors. Please help.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Any company that says that you can make money by paying them is a rip off.

    If they truly believed their money making system would work, they would let them pay the $4,000 out of their future profits instead of requiring it up front.

    The following tip offs are there also:

    1. They do not list a physical mailing address on their web site, which is suspicious.

    2. They do not list what state they are incorporated in.

    3. They are not registered with, and there are no better business bureau reports on them.

    4. They changed their name, the owner is listed as Anthony Morrison CEO of Affiliate Income, Inc .

    5. There is no state of incorporation listed for Affiliate Income, Inc.

    6. Affiliate Income, Inc. is not registered with the Better Business Bureau

    7. Nowhere on his web site, does it state what you have to do to make money.

    I was able to find Affiliate Income, Inc, incorporated in Mississipi, effective Jan 2, 2007 on November 14, 2006, so they have only been in business for about 6 months.

    Link to their articles of Incorporation:

    http://www.sos.state.ms.us/imaging/29574514.pdf

    The corporation is only authorized to issue 500 shares of common stock, of which only 100 shares are outstanding, as of the time of filing of their annual report. The nature of their business is listed as marketing.

    The hiddenmillionaires domain name was registered on Feb 8, 2007 to:

    Morrison, Anthony anthony@coolblueperformance.com

    CBP

    128 brookside place

    madison, Mississippi 39110

    United States

    (601) 488-1062

    Isn't it funny that they have all those "success stores" after only 5 months, yet still cannot fix spelling and grammarical errors in their web site.

    You find that online with a whois:

    http://www.networksolutions.com/whois/results.jsp?...

    Link to their annual report:

    http://www.sos.state.ms.us/imaging/30088221.pdf

    Link to the BBB: http://www.bbb.org/

    Even though Anthony Morrison seems to have a Mississippi address, he used someone else with a different address as a registered agent for his corporation, although this is a common practice, he had to pay extra to hire them to do this to do this.

    This is usually done if you do not have a physical mailing address in that state. When a company already has a physical mailing address in the state of incorporation, the reason you pay someone else to be a registered agent, is because you do not want your company's physical mailing address known. This is suspicious.

    I checked out the phone number at the Better Business Bureau, and it belongs to a company called Cool Blue Performance, an Auto Parts supply company, and they are not a member of the BBB and have an unsatisfactory performance record. They have never responded to any customer complaints, of which they have had 7 complaints in the last year, 12 in the last 3 years. Bear in mind that those are only the complaints that were reported to the Better Business Bureau.

    Cool Blue Performance has the same address and telephone number for hiddenmillionaires.com, yet the web site does not mention that they are an auto parts company at all.

    http://www.mississippi.bbb.org/commonreport.html?c...

  • ?
    Lv 6
    4 years ago

    For Credit and finance solutions I visit this site where you can find all the solutions. http://loansandfinances.info/index.html?src=szybjD...

    RE :Hiddenmillionaires.com A Scam?

    My grandmother went to the hiddenmillionaires.com conference as advertised on television. I have a funny feeling that the conference targets retirees/older people who are prone to get rich schemes presented by confidence men. Basically, what I would like to know is

    a) Does anyone have any experience with this money making program?

    b) Why would someone sell their highly lucrative strategy if the market wasn't already saturated?

    c) Is there a non-compete clause in the contract, assuming that a contract even exists in the first place?

    d) She said that the up-front cost is 4k. If the up-front costs exceed 4k, is it possible to make that money back in a reasonable time?

    Basically, I want to make sure that this isn't an "I get rich at your expense" investment as usually people who create infomercials set this as their ultimate goal. I went to their website www.hiddenmillionaires.com and there wasn't much to be found aside from spelling and grammatical errors. Please help.

    3 following 4 answers

    Source(s): For Credit and finance solutions I visit this site where you can find all the solutions. http://loansandfinances.info/index.html?src=szybjD...
  • Luis
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Sounds like a pyramid scheme.

    You pay your $4k, then bring other people into the fold who pay their $4k, you get a kickback.

    But really, if they want you to make money WITH them, then they wouldn't CHARGE you as if you were a CUSTOMER.

    I say tell your grandmother to put her $4k in an ING savings account and gather interest, or at least use it to get an oven, some signs, and a spot at the mall where she can make her famous pies or something. At least then she'll be busy and doing something she loves, and even if she fails she'll've lost the $4k doing something fun, rather than to a scam.

  • 1 decade ago

    You can bet they're fleecing people

    seems that the top dogs were involved in a lending scam in the past - now they are scamming the public promising them millions

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You know the answer, you just have to convince grandma

    True why sell a program that works, just use it

    Whenever anyone "sells you a job" you know theres a problem

  • 1 decade ago

    I wldn't even let ma grandad register

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