Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentCivic Participation · 1 decade ago

The Statue of Liberty or the Statue of Tyranny?

The Statue of Tyranny? Of course not. It's the Statue of Liberty.

But a group called Summum is suing - demanding that the city of Pleasant Grove, Utah, erect Summum's ''Seven Aphorisms,'' which it claims represent ''higher'' knowledge, next to a Ten Commandments monument already on display.

The result if they win? Any government that displays a Ten Commandments monument or a patriotic memorial will be compelled to display a monument in opposition to the Ten Commandments or an anti-American monument.

What do you think of this latest attack on America?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I think it's just more of the spirit of the anti-christ being revealed. (1 John 2: 18-22; 4:3) It is evident from these passages that the spirit of the anti-christ has been active since the first century and it continues to be active today, preparing the way for anti-christ (the man, the "son of perdition" to be revealed).

    Source(s): KJV
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  • Judy L
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    They already won. A federal court of appeals has overturned the ruling of a U.S. District Judge, which blocked Summum's proposed monuments, stating that equal space in city parks must be given to all religions, not just Judeo-Christian ones.. Attorney Brian Barnard, who represents Summum, says he is pushing his clients to display their Seven Aphorism's in Pleasant Grove as soon as possible.

    This win in no way compels others to display monuments in opposition to the Ten Commandments or anti-American monuments. You are uninformed. In Salt Lake County and Ogden County, similar lawsuits were brought, and won, by Summon. The Counties response? They removed the Ten Commandments, stating that no religious monuments would be displayed in the public parks. Try getting your facts straight first.

    PS (I can tell that whoever gets best answer on this "question" will be the one that agrees with your POV. I just thought you might like a little facts to go along with your fiction).

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  • 1 decade ago

    Have you even read the Seven Aphorisms? If not, why do you automatically assume that they're anti-Christian or anti-American? For that matter, why have so many necons taken to calling any and all opposing viewpoints anti-American? America was founded as a country where people could be free to believe what they wanted to believe and live as they wanted to live, so why do you want everyone to conform to your way? That is what's truly un-American, because it undermines our freedom and our rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. By the way, the Seven Aphorisms can be found at the link below if you care to know what you're ranting about.

    Maybe the Seven Aphorisms shouldn't be posted in government buildings, but in that case the Ten Commandments shouldn't either. Church and State should be kept separate.

    I don't have any feelings about the Seven Aphorisms one way or the other, but the story behind them is that they're supposed to be what was on the original stone tablets Moses brought down from the mountain and broke before returning for the Ten Commandments. If you believe in the Ten Commandments, why would you say they're in opposition if they came from the same source? Maybe you should do a little research before getting emotional.

    In any case, I say neither should be displayed in government buildings, because if every religion asked for equal representation (which would be fair and legal), every government building would be wallpapered from end to end with scriptures of every known religion, and that's not what government facilities are for.

    [edit]

    I think the three thumbs down are disturbing, because I haven't said anything that a rational person who has read the Bill of Rights could argue with. It's called the First Amendment, folks, and it's the first sentence of it, so our founding fathers considered it to be extremely important. It says, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." Allowing the display of scriptures for one religion and prohibiting it for another is a violation of the First Amendment (see second link).

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  • 1 decade ago

    The decission to erect a monument should be up to the people of the community. Vote on it!

    By the way, the ten commandments is not Christion, it's Jewish.

    Jesus said only 2. Love God above all others & love others as yourself.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I believe in separation of church and state. However, it is difficult to separate a state that was founded on religious ideology (particularlyof the Christian type). If we are going to separate religion and state, we need to take "In God We Trust" off our currency and references to God in every other sacred document and euphism of our country including the pledge of allegiance. Many people oppose displaying the 10 commandants but don't oppose these other forms of religious rhetoric embedded in our government. I think its hypocrisy...

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  • 1 decade ago

    It blows me away the lengths people will go to in order to cause havoc or confusion. I can't imagine it would pass, but if it does, it will be a sad day for the United States. I don't expect people to change religions, or suddenly believe in God, but we should all have respect enough not to destroy a building or its attributes because they are a direct reflection of somebody's, and especially a large group of peoples', beliefs. I don't think McDonalds is good for you, but I'm not going to go tarnishing the Golden Arches every time I see them.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Shut-up you god-damn right winger. Please, American foreign policy has caused the deaths of millions of people across the globe. From supporting military dictatorships in Latin America, to Iraq, Iran, Cuba, Pol Pot , etc. I think you get the point that to Americans it's the statue of liberty, to people less fortunate, it's the the statue of oppression, tyranny, and imperialism.

    How about you read a history book NOT from a high school.

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  • 1 decade ago

    It is simply a law issue of sorts. No legislation can use government money to fund an "icon" like that. There is the separation of church and state clause. But who knows they seem to bypass everything else.

    Source(s): Any public school in America
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    First of all, the ten commandments on government property violates the constitution, you know, that thing that we founded our country on? anyway, if they can put the ten commandment up, why not put a koran in their, and that quasi menora from kwanzaa so on and so forth. basically if Christians can violate the constitution, why cant they?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I long for a return of common sense to our society.

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