How to fix a fan heater?

I've got a simple portable 3-speed fan heater at home - it's called a Magic Line, Model 104 - which has stopped working. I object to just throwing it out and buying a new one and would therefore like some guidance to try to fix it. The switch, the element, the thermostat and the basic wiring all seem to be fine. There's a small component near the motor (it could be a capacitor) that may not be working, but I'm not sure. Where could I find further information (wiring, etc) to help me to try to get it going again? Thanks. Errol

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    most of the time the thermo-stat burns out or a wire burns off a terminal check all wiring for signs of a burnt wire

    or the over heat switch goes bad look closely at each area for signs of burnt into wire or switch that is burned up i have worked on those space heaters all of the time they are a pain in the ........

    Source(s): Master Electrican 20 years
  • 4 years ago

    Portable Fan Heater

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    How to fix a fan heater?

    I've got a simple portable 3-speed fan heater at home - it's called a Magic Line, Model 104 - which has stopped working. I object to just throwing it out and buying a new one and would therefore like some guidance to try to fix it. The switch, the element, the thermostat and the basic...

    Source(s): fix fan heater: https://tr.im/k8LW3
  • 1 decade ago

    If you are experienced with electricity, and have access to a testing meter, verify that you have voltage at each load. Start with the power in, go to the switch, turn the switch on, verify the power goes across the switch, and to the heater or fan. Verify you have current across the fan and element.

    If you have jumpers, disconnect the individual elements of the circuit and then verify they work individually by jumping power directly to them. Unplug the heater, wire the element directly to power, then plug in for a moment. If you get heat, the element is good. Unplug and hook up the fan. Plug it in to verify if the fan runs.

    With the switch disconnected, ohm out the switch, You should have infinite ohms with the switch open (in off position) and very low ohms with the switch closed. Do this with the safety as well.

    If the component near the motor is a capacitor, it should have a microfarad rating, It may look like 6.5 mfd, or 7uf. You will need a capacitance tester to verify if it working or not. A quick test is to remove it from the circuit, and ohm across the leads, then from one lead to the case. If you have continuity across the leads, it may be OK. If you get continuity from a lead to the case, you need to replace it.

    Unfortunately, these devices are designed to be used until they break, thrown out and replaced. It would cost more in labor to find a trained person to fix it than a new one would cost.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Please define "stopped working." Does it heat, and not blow, blow and not heat or does it do neither?

    I'm guessing neither. It should have some kind of safety switch, that won't let it work if it is tipped over. Is that your small mystery component?

    If that is your "tip over switch" you could by pass it. FOR TESTING ONLY!!

    It is a safety device --- fix it or replace it.

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