Knights of the Round Table???

Who are the 12 knights of the round table who is with King Arthur?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Accounts differ about the origin of the Round Table, at which Arthur's knights met to tell of their deeds and from which they invariably set forth in search of further adventures. The Norman chronicler Wace was the first to mention it, in his Roman de Brut of 1155. There, he simply says that Arthur devised the idea of a round table to prevent quarrels between his barons over the question of precedence. Another writer, Layamon, adapted Wace's account and added to it, describing a quarrel between Arthur's lords which was settled by a Cornish carpenter who, on hearing of the problem, created a portable table which could seat 1600 men. Both Wace and Layamon refer to Breton story-tellers as their source for this and there is little reason to doubt them. This being the case, the origins of the table may well date back to Celtic times, and even be traceable to the age of Arthur himself. In the later medieval stories, however, it is Merlin who is responsible for the creation of the table. Malory, taking up the theme and developing it, made it the centre-piece of his epic re-telling.

  • 1 decade ago

    King Arthur had 150 Knights of the Round table. The foremost ones were Sirs Galahad, Lancelot, Tristram, Lamerok and Gawain in the younger generation. Bors and Percival were the only ones besides Galahad who were sinless and saw the Holy Grail. Before that, King Pellinore father of Percival and Lamerok was strongest. Pelleas was another strong one. Charlemagne had 12 paladins. Roland and Ogier the Dane were strongest.

  • 1 decade ago

    There are more than 12 knights listed in the Arthurian legends who could be members of the Round "Table." They include Lancelot, Galahad, Bedwen, and several others. But the "Round Table" may be a misnomer. There probably was a King "Arthur," but not in the way the stories tell. In the 500's, about when he was to exist, war leaders carried banners with their symbols and were identified by them. For example, a "merlin" is a small hawk, so Merlin may have been the title of a lord with a hawk on his banner. "Arthur is a combination of Latin and Celtic--"arth" is Celtic for "bear," and as you probably remember, "ursa" is Latin for bear. Most likely, his real name is lost to history, but a great warlord who carried a bear on his banner is probably "Arthur."

    Also, I question whether it was really a round "table." The French who created most of the romantic Arthurian legends like to make fun of the British and the Celts. They thought they were backward, so whenever they could twist around the meaning of words, they probably did. For example, the Celtic word for "bed" also translates to "altar" in Old French. So when Lancelot and Guenevere were caught rising up from a bloody "bed," they may actually have been performing a sacrifice at a bloody altar. That wouldn't have been so heineous as an affair in a lenient Christian court, like Arthur was supposed to have.

    The Celtic word for "table" translates into Old French as "tableau," which can mean either table or building. There are many old beehive-shaped buildings which are still standing in England, and there would certainly have been more room for an army of knights in a round building that around a round table.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I don't know what all that crap is above me, but i know of

    Launcelot

    Merlin (but he wasn't a knight)

    Gallahad

    Ector ( he took care of arthur as a child)

    Gawiane

    Geraint

    Gareth

    Gaheris

    Bors

    Bedivere

    Kay

    Lamorak

    Percivale

    Tristan

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  • 1 decade ago

    In some versions there are up to 1600 knights, these are the ones I've heard of

    King Arthur

    Sir Aglovale, son of King Pellinore of Listinoise

    Sir Agravaine, son of King Lot of Orkney

    King Bagdemagus

    Sir Bedivere (Bedwyr)

    Sir Bors, King of Gannes (Gaul)

    Sir Breunor, also known as "La Cote Male Taile"

    Sir Cador

    Sir Caradoc, called "Caradoc Vreichvras", or "Caradoc Strong Arm"

    Sir Colgrevance

    Sir Constantine, son of Cador, who became king after Arthur's death

    Sir Dagonet, the court jester

    Sir Daniel

    Sir Dinadan, the son of Sir Brunor Senior and brother of Sirs Brunor le Noir 'La Cote Mal Taillée' and Daniel.

    Sir Ector, Arthur's foster father and Sir Kay's father

    Sir Ector de Maris, the son of King Ban of Benwick

    Sir Elyan the White, the son of Sir Bors

    Sir Erec, (see also Geraint)

    Sir Gaheris

    Sir Galahad (son of Lancelot; his seat was the Siege Perilous)

    Sir Gareth, also called Beaumains or Goodhands

    Sir Gawain (Gawaine, Walganus, Balbhuaidh, Gwalchmai)

    Sir Geraint (see also Erec)

    Sir Gingalain, called at first Sir Le Bel Inconnu ("The "Fair Unknown"), Gawain's son

    Sir Griflet, also called Sir Griflet le Fils de Dieu

    King Hoel

    Sir Kay (Cai, Caius), Arthur's stepbrother, son of Sir Ector

    Sir Lamorak

    Sir Lancelot (Launcelot du Lac, father of Sir Galahad)

    King Leodegrance, Guinevere's father and keeper of the Round Table

    Sir Lionel

    Sir Lucan

    Sir Maleagant, who abducted Guinevere

    Sir Mordred, Arthur's illegitimate son and destroyer of the kingdom

    Sir Morholt

    Sir Palamedes the Saracen

    Sir Pelleas, husband of the Lady of the Lake

    King Pellinore

    Sir Percival (Perceval, Peredur), son of Pellinore

    Sir Sagramore le Desirous

    Sir Safir, brother of Palamedes

    Sir Segwarides, brother of Palamedes

    Sir Tor

    Sir Tristram (Tristan)

    King Uriens

    Sir Ywain (Owain), son of King Uriens of Gore

    Sir Ywain the Bastard, also son of Uriens

    Source(s): OME and wikipedia
  • 1 decade ago

    * King Arthur

    * Sir Aglovale, son of King Pellinore of Listinoise

    * Sir Agravaine, son of King Lot of Orkney

    * King Bagdemagus

    * Sir Bedivere (Bedwyr)

    * Sir Bors, King of Gannes (Gaul)

    * Sir Breunor, also known as "La Cote Male Taile"

    * Sir Cador

    * Sir Caradoc, called "Caradoc Vreichvras", or "Caradoc Strong Arm"

    * Sir Colgrevance

    * Sir Constantine, son of Cador, who became king after Arthur's death

    * Sir Dagonet, the court jester

    * Sir Daniel

    * Sir Dinadan, the son of Sir Brunor Senior and brother of Sirs Brunor le Noir 'La Cote Mal Taillée' and Daniel.

    * Sir Ector, Arthur's foster father and Sir Kay's father

    * Sir Ector de Maris, the son of King Ban of Benwick

    * Sir Elyan the White, the son of Sir Bors

    * Sir Erec, (see also Geraint)

    * Sir Gaheris

    * Sir Galahad (son of Lancelot; his seat was the Siege Perilous)

    * Sir Gareth, also called Beaumains or Goodhands

    * Sir Gawain (Gawaine, Walganus, Balbhuaidh, Gwalchmai)

    * Sir Geraint (see also Erec)

    * Sir Gingalain, called at first Sir Le Bel Inconnu ("The "Fair Unknown"), Gawain's son

    * Sir Griflet, also called Sir Griflet le Fils de Dieu

    * King Hoel

    * Sir Kay (Cai, Caius), Arthur's stepbrother, son of Sir Ector

    * Sir Lamorak

    * Sir Lancelot (Launcelot du Lac, father of Sir Galahad)

    * King Leodegrance, Guinevere's father and keeper of the Round Table

    * Sir Lionel

    * Sir Lucan

    * Sir Maleagant, who abducted Guinevere

    * Sir Mordred, Arthur's illegitimate son and destroyer of the kingdom

    * Sir Morholt

    * Sir Palamedes the Saracen

    * Sir Pelleas, husband of the Lady of the Lake

    * King Pellinore

    * Sir Percival (Perceval, Peredur), son of Pellinore

    * Sir Sagramore le Desirous

    * Sir Safir, brother of Palamedes

    * Sir Segwarides, brother of Palamedes

    * Sir Tor

    * Sir Tristram (Tristan)

    * King Uriens

    * Sir Ywain (Owain), son of King Uriens of Gore

    * Sir Ywain the Bastard, also son of Uriens

    In addition, Malory's account includes many obscure knights during the episode containing Sir Urry:

    King Angwish of Ireland, Earl Aristance, Sir Arrok, Sir Ascamore, Sir Barrant le Apres (King with a Hundred Knights), Sir Bellenger le Beau, Sir Belliance le Orgulous, Sir Blamor de Ganis, Sir Bleoberis de Ganis, Sir Borre le Coeur Hardi (King Arthur's son), Sir Brandiles, Sir Brian de Listinoise, King Carados of Scotland, Sir Cardok, Duke Chalance of Clarence, King Clariance of Northumberland, Sir Clarus of Cleremont, Sir Clegis, Sir Clodrus, Sir Colgrevance, Sir Crosslem, Sir Damas Sir Degrave sans Villainy (fought with the giant of the Black Lowe), Sir Degrevant, Sir Dinas le Seneschal de Cornwall, Sir Dinas, Sir Dodinas le Savage, Sir Dornar, Sir Driant, Sir Edward of Caernarvon, Sir Edward of Orkney, Sir Epinogris (son of King Clariance of Northumberland), Sir Fergus, Sir Florence and Sir Lovell (sons of Gawain by Sir Brandiles's sister), Sir Gahalantine, Sir Galahalt (a duke known as the Haut Prince), Sir Galihodin, Sir Galleron of Galway, Sir Gauter, Sir Gillimer, Sir Grummor Grummorson, Sir Gumret le Petit, Sir Harry le Fils Lake, Sir Hebes (not Hebes le Renowne), Sir Hebes le Renowne, Sir Hectimere, Sir Helian le Blanc, Sir Herminde, Sir Hervis de la Forest Savage, Sir Ironside (Knight of the Red Launds), Sir Kay l'Estrange (not Kay, Arthur's seneschal), Earl Lambaile, Sir Lambegus, Sir Lamiel of Cardiff, Sir Lavain, Sir Lucan the Butler, Sir Mador de la Porte, Sir Marrok (whose wife turned him into a werewolf for seven years), Sir Melias de l'Isle, Sir Melion of the Mountain, Sir Meliot de Logris, Sir Menaduke, Sir Morganor, King Nentres of Garlot, Sir Neroveus, Sir Ozanna le Coeur Hardi, Sir Perimones (brother to Persant and Pertolepe. Called the Red Knight), Sir Persant, Sir Pertolepe, Sir Petipace of Winchelsea, Sir Plaine de Fors, Sir Plenorius, Sir Priamus, Sir Reynold, Sir Sadok, Sir Selises of the Dolorous Tower Sir Sentrail, Sir Severause le Breuse (known for rejecting battles with men in favor of giants, dragons, and wild beasts), Sir Suppinabiles, Earl Ulbawes, Sir Urry, Sir Uwain le Avoutres, and Sir Villiars the Valiant.

    Sir Urry is a Hungarian knight who comes to Camelot, seeking Arthur's help in healing his wounds. In the end, 110 knights, in addition to Arthur, are unable to heal Sir Urry. When Sir Lancelot arrives in Camelot, his touch heals the wounded knight. This scene depicts all the knights together at the same time, with the exception of those deceased, on quest, or otherwise ascended (as with Galahad).

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