Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 decade ago

Where does the phrase, "Thus Endeth The Lesson" originate?

Is it from a book? A play? Of course I'm leaning toward Shakespeare at this point, that would be pretty standard for this kind of thing... A translation from Latin or Greek, perhaps? The thing has found such common use on the internet, the primary source material is never the first thing in a search. Does anybody know for certain? If possible, please point me to the exact quotation, in context, which I could perhaps cite in a bibliography. Thanks in advance!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Yes, "Here endeth the lesson" is a traditional wrap-up phrase after a Bible reading in church, especially from the King James version. It was common up until about the 1950s, and probably in several different denominations, but it has gradually been eliminated because it sounds so dated, particularly after a passage from a more modern translation.

    However, it is still specified as the wording after the Bible reading in one form of Anglican service, according to the web page below which is an online copy of part of their "Book of Common Order".

    Bible readings in our church end with this:

    (Reader) This is the word of the Lord.

    (All respond) Thanks be to God.

  • 3 years ago

    Here Endeth The Lesson

  • 4 years ago

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    RE:

    Where does the phrase, "Thus Endeth The Lesson" originate?

    Is it from a book? A play? Of course I'm leaning toward Shakespeare at this point, that would be pretty standard for this kind of thing... A translation from Latin or Greek, perhaps? The thing has found such common use on the internet, the primary source material is never the first thing in a...

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  • Sterz
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Sounds like from the liturgy.

    Just found it. In some High Church liturgies, such as the episcopalian one, the solemn readings from the bible as part of the liturgy, or sometimes also sermons, end "Here endeth the lesson" ("thus" seems to be a misquote).

    The phrase was famously used ironically in the film :"The Untouchables" (1987):

    Malone: You just fulfilled the first rule of law enforcement: make sure when your shift is over you go home alive. Here endeth the lesson. "

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  • 4 years ago

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    Several expressions in French attempt to link various practices perceived as unsavory to England, e.g., "l'éducation anglaise" (disciplining children by sexually-tinged spanking). Ironically, several expressions are used by both the English and the French to describe the same unacceptable habit, but attributing the habit to the other people : e.g., "taking French leave" (leaving a party or other gathering without taking polite leave of one's host) is referred to in French as "filer à l'anglaise" (literally, "flee English-style"), while the (now somewhat archaic) expression "French letter" (referring to a condom) is rendered in French as "capote anglaise". During the 16th century in England, genital herpes was called the "French disease" and "French-sick" was a term for syphilis. These are also considered examples of Francophobia.

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