Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Home & GardenMaintenance & Repairs · 1 decade ago

Can I install ceramic tile on top of existing ceramic tile on bathroom floor?

I heard mixed reviews on this idea. Please tell me how to install tile over tile. For the people who say it's a bad idea, please explain why using ceramic tile as a subfloor is inferior to a concrete or wood subfloor? There has to be a legitimate explanation other than "it's not the right way"

Update:

I don't have to worry about leveling, because the floor is already level from when the first tiles were installed.

Plus, there is an adhesive for EVERYTHING. You can't truly say that the new tile won't stick to the old tile. That's like saying the tile surface is ADHESIVE RESISTANT.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    no, you should remove the old tile first.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Okay, I read a lot of good answers there. I too am against putting tile on tile. However, I will not say it CAN'T be done. The one thing that I didn't see brought up was the height it will add to the floor. You will need a leveling compound and tile adhesive underneath the tile. So what's that, an additional 3/8"+ to the height of the floor?

    Take that into account and then look at the doors in the bathroom. If the door will still swing with the added height and you want to cut that corner, by all means do. But I do agree that the first layer of tile should be in excellent condition before you do it. If it is loose, cracked, whatever the same will happen to the tile on top of it.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It can be done... I'd say the reason many people wouldn't recommend it is because adhesives don't adhere quite as well to the tops of tiles. You'd also probably have larger gaps between the layers that may not completely fill with adhesive, causing the floor to have less strength. A thicker adhesive layer will cause more flexing / cracking. I worked in a place where some of the ceramic tile floor was installed over an old ceramic tile floor. The grout in that part of the floor did begin to crack and tiles came loose after a few years.

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  • 3 years ago

    Laying Tile Over Tile

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Can I install ceramic tile on top of existing ceramic tile on bathroom floor?

    I heard mixed reviews on this idea. Please tell me how to install tile over tile. For the people who say it's a bad idea, please explain why using ceramic tile as a subfloor is inferior to a concrete or wood subfloor? There has to be a legitimate explanation other than "it's not the...

    Source(s): install ceramic tile top existing ceramic tile bathroom floor: https://tr.im/ZUOtF
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  • 1 decade ago

    As with all tile, if its not being installed on a hard flat surface then you need to use cement board to install the tile onto it. You never install tile directly to a wood floor, as it will crack and shift prematurely. To keep tile from cracking, you have to prevent shifting of the tile and the best way to accomplish this is with a solid underlayment, cement board.

    As long as the tile is not severely broken in pieces it will be okay. Then lay the cement board over the tile and screw to the floor with masonry screws, not nails. Then install the tile over the cement board. If you dont use the cement board the tile will crack and the glue will not adhere since the exisiting tile is probably glossy and unlevel due to the grout lines between each tile.

    People usually do not install tile to exisitng tile because the added stackup will cause door clearance and threshold problems that are not feasible to fix.

    People usually install tile over exisiting tile if its the type of tile, like was in my house, that was used in the 1950's. These tiny tiles are practically cemented to the floor and it feels as if you need a jack hammer to remove.

    In short, check your door/threshold clearances, it will raise your floor probably 1/2"-5/8" based on 1/4" cement board, 1/4" tile, and some thickness for glue.

    Good Luck!

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    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    If the subfloor is solid and the existing tile is solid, you could tile right over it but I don't recommend doing it that way. If you insist, at least put a layer of luanne board over the existing and then build on top of that. You are definitely adding extra weight on the joists if the floor is not on a slab. If you are on a slab and have to ever do any plumbing work in the floor, you will have quite a job repairing the floor afterward. Remember to check if the closet flange for the commode can be raised to the new floor height.

    Just take it up, it's the right way.

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  • 1 decade ago

    My husband does this for a living. You can do it if you want, but it is not a good idea because if the tile underneath gets loose and broken the tiles on top also will and then it will all go bad. Concrete and wood are one big piece and will not break like the tile will.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yep, your'e right....an adhesive for everything.

    Did a" tile over tile " job in bathroom using an adhesive made for that purpose..(.home ctr..).

    The subfloor was sound & " tiling over" made it easy .

    Only thing I had to do was get a thicker wax ring for the toilet

    since I took up the bowl to tile under it.

    Proof was, when I did some renovation later on & had to rip up the floor, the old & new tile came up together.

    Best regards

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  • 1 decade ago

    I am by no means an expert but I can tell you the I recently had new slate floors installed and a small section (2x3ft) was laid over an exsisting ceramic tile floor.

    The tile guy was recomended by my father in law (a builder) so I have no doubt that they know what they're doing.

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  • 1 decade ago

    You're not really using the existing tile as a subfloor as the actual subfloor is underneath that.

    Besides raising your floor up even more by doing this you're not going to get good seating on the new tile and are likely going to be replacing it and the tile beneath it in short order.

    You're attempting a shortcut instead of doing it right. Funny thing that. There's never enough time to do it right but always enough time to do it twice.

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