Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationCar MakesGMC · 1 decade ago

Who do you think killed the EV1 electric Car?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Well of course GM pulled the plug, so they killed it. Personally, I think they killed it because it threatened their typical business. Electric vehicles are very reliable - I drive a 25-year-old electric car that has all its original motor and electronic parts - no service has been required in all those years. And no oil changes, filters, coolant, etc. I can easily pay for replacing batteries every 5 years with the money I save on engine maintenance.

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    The electricity to drive it only costs me one penny per mile. Gas is 10 to 20 times this, and could get even worse before this summer is over.

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    To answer some typical responses to your question, there is - and was, in the EV1's day, demonstrated market demand for electric cars (even imperfect EVs like the EV1). Here are some marketing surveys that show this to be true:

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    http://www.greencars.org/pdf/gcimarketing.pdf

    http://www.theautochannel.com/news/press/date/2000...

    http://ideas.repec.org/p/cdl/itsdav/ucd-its-rep-96...

    http://www.synovate.com/current/news/article/2006/...

    http://www.motherjones.com/news/feature/2001/01/ze...

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    Also, the second generation EV1 with NIMH batteries had a range of about 130 miles per charge, with a battery lifetime of about 150,000 miles.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I worked at Delco Battery in Muncie Ind in the early 90's where we made the battery packs for the EV1 in a joint venture with Ford and Chrysler. We had the Gov. of Ind ,several congressmen and senators and every TV station in Indianapolis there as well as local govt.I was inteviewed by a station in Indianapolis as saying well I will never have to transfer again since they shut down my factory(Norwood Assembly). They weren't conventional batteries like 6-12-24 volt they were 10 volt lashed together, and the old timers I worked with (who had anywhere from 35-50+ yrs and knew how to build a Quality battery said they wouldn' hold the charge a 12 volt would because of the mix and voltage. Then the First Gulf War ended and gas prices fell dramatically!!! Our Industry was trying to figure out how to go cross country in an EV at the time also. Would we have trading stations where you could "swap out" your battery pack for a fresh one. How would we accomplish this? Also if ya wrecked one ya had a hazardous spill with the accident that had to be dealt with nationwide also. Like I said, as soon as the first Gulf War ended and we brought our troops home "as prices fell through the floor!" an those $10,000 battery backs didn't matter anymore

    Source(s): GM emp 31 yrs. and worked at Delco Battery in Muncie from 1990-1996
  • 1 decade ago

    Influence from the oil industry? That would be my only rational guess, unless GM was just in over its head and could not make them work at all.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Economics. The thing had not the range to support the price that would have been required to sell them profitably.

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  • 1 decade ago

    oil companies

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    it's always about the money

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