Mr.Moogle asked in SportsMartial Arts · 1 decade ago

sword help?

alright, well i wanna buy a training sword but don't know which material. does anyone know the strongest material for a samurai's training sword?

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  • Mushin
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    In iaido (art of classical Japanese sword-drawing), you start training with a bokken (wooden replica) for at least the first six months. Thereafter, you progress onto an iai-to, (training 'katana'). They are usually alloy-based and unsharpened for safe practise.

    In kendo, a shinai is used, which is a 'sword' made of bamboo. In kendo, they mainly practise sparring, hence the bamboo 'sword'.

    In other sword-arts, eg. kung fu and tai chi etc, replica wooden and metal (unsharpened) swords are also used.

    Have a look at these sites for inspiration:

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  • 4 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Woodworking Techniques http://givitry.info/WoodworkingProjects
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  • 1 decade ago

    A training sword! Training being the operative word there I would say. Buy a simple pummel and corded, inexpensive, aluminum alloy bladed one that you will not worry about drooping. I would also buy a wooden boken or two-one heavy-one light. By practicing with both along with your sword you can more easily build your speed and power in some of your drawing and slashing techniques. If you are talking about practicing your cutting skills then there are some very nice folded Swedish steel bladed swords in the price range of $500.00-$900.00. Aluminum alloy bladed swords and stainless steel bladed swords are for show and Kata-not actually cutting and their blades do not hold an edge or are not strong enough and break. They range in price from $150.00-$250.00 and bokens $15.00-$25.00.

    Some of your more elaborate corded swords with all kinds of junk on them hamper or slow sword drawing and slashing techniques and are uncomfortable to use so the simpler ones would be the best for starting out. Check out Bugei Trading Company; they have a section on sword and sword buying that's informative. For practice type swords and bokens Century Martial Arts and Asian World have a good selection. If you want a real, authentic sword that is registered in Japan the prices for them start at around $10-15k and go up from there and are made of folded steel.

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  • 1 decade ago

    In Kenjitsu they always use bamboo or hardwood bokken or shinai. The Shinai tends to be used more by kendo then kenjitsu, but kenjitsu is the more realistic of the two for training and they can use both depending on the goal of that days work.

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  • 1 decade ago

    If you spar, you should try a wooden of bamboo bokken (pratice blade) They give you the weight you need if you ever get in a duel. You don't want to spar with a sharp temepered steel, since you might have an accident and the steel typically will enter you body.

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  • 1 decade ago

    a bokuto (wooden)sword is really good for training. I recommend these over a shinai (bamboo) because you will learn to handle sword weight better. Also, shinai sting when get hit and can break easily

    Source(s): experience with bokuto
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  • 1 decade ago

    I have a wooden bokken and a katana with an aluminum blade that I bought from martialartsmart.com.

    The bokken is for sparring and kata. The aluminum is for demo practice, iaido practice and for actual demonstrations during tournaments etc.

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