which major will be better before law school:Finance or Political Science????

I'm between these two.My goal is to become a judge in a future.Which could be better for me??? thank you!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    political science FOR SURE. there is no question about this. they want to see that you can write well and they want to see your analytical abilities. can you analyze an argument well? that is what is comes down to chief. doesn't matter how good you are with finances because that wont help you at all in law school. this is why the vast majority of law students are political science and english majors.

  • 1 decade ago

    Doesn't matter. I was Political Science - PreLaw as an undergraduate, specialty International Relations, Economics minor. I had law school classmates with backgrounds in Business, Finance, Economics, a PHD in Computer Programming, Sociology, Education, Latin, Accounting, and more. You will find a lot of Political Science majors who want to go to law school, but it is not going to prepare you any better than Finance.

    Pick the field you like better. If I could go back and start over with what I know now, I would have majored in Urban & Regional Planning as an undergrad and probably gotten a joint JD-MURP. My specialty is municipal law, zoning and real estate. I just focused on going to law school rather than figuring out what I wanted to practice; I would do it differently again.

    But if your goal is to be a judge, finance would be a good choice. Damages is the key to most lawsuits, and finance will help prepare you to understand how to compute damages.

  • 1 decade ago

    Personally, I think a degree in English will better benefit you in law school. The others might be good, also, but English will give you a much better background in composing and documenting papers. You can always take some electives in both finance and poli sci, but I know a number of current attorneys who are very glad they took the English background.

    Some schools will allow you to take a stronger emphasis in rhetoric and composition so you don't spend more time than you need in literature (although, that's not so bad, either...it gives you a well-rounded background).

    I have both a bachelors and a masters degree (emphasis in teaching writing) in English, and I've had offers from attorneys to be a legal assistant without the law degree simply because what English majors do is read something, analyze it and write a paper about it...all the necessities of a legal brief.

    Good luck!

  • 1 decade ago

    I think finance would be better because there a lot of law students with political science degrees. I have heard that law schools are trying to get people with different degrees because they are trying to be more academically diverse. They just dont want the English, political science majors, pre-law majors only anymore.

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  • blah
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    It doesn't matter.

    Law schools really don't care what your undergrad degree is in. So unless you want to go into a specific area of law (ie. tax law = accounting, IP law = engineering, etc.) where the employers will want a specific background, just do what interests you.

    If you don't believe me, call up the admissions office of a nearby law school. If they are honest with you, they will tell the same thing.

  • 1 decade ago

    Oh political science is a much better preference for law school. You will learn a lot about writing and arguing that will serve you well and you will learn about a broader range of topics.

  • 1 decade ago

    Finance, anything math related will teach you how to think logically. The LSAT is full of if -> then statements. Plus think of the better paid internships you can get to help pay for law school.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    i dont' think it matters much - but maybe think about what type of lawyer you want to be or which area of law you would like to focus your studies on.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It doesn't make a bit of difference. I am actually serious.

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