Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Games & RecreationGambling · 1 decade ago

How do you know when or when not to slow play pocket Aces or Kings pre-flop?

Just wondering what other people's thoughts and ideas are on this.

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  • ZCT
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Well first off, it depends on your position, and how many callers there are.

    If you are in late position and you have several callers before you, it is a horrible idea to slow play and limp. Your pocket aces hold up against four opponents just 56% of the time against random hands (50% for kings). Against good hands, your odds are even worse.

    If you are in early position and you limp you run the risk of several more limpers leading to the same problem as above.

    So next you have to consider your table image. Do they think you are tight or loose? Are they tight or loose? How has your image changed recently?

    If you are playing tight (or they think you are) they may fear a raise, but also be suspicious of a limp. If you are playing bold aggressive poker and you suddenly limp, they may again wonder what's up.

    I think that in general terms you should be fairly straightforward with aces or kings. Try to get heads up with them. I'd probably only limp if I knew I would be heads up on the flop.

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  • 1 decade ago

    On a no limit poker game you NEVER want to just limp in with Aces or Kings. This is the biggest mistake people make when they get their Aces or kings cracked. By just limping in, you are allowing more hands to come in preflop and when the flop hits there are too many more combinations that are going to beat you. Against junk hands limping you are not going to get any more than the single bet they made preflop because of the simple fact it is a bad hand. If you let them in to see the flop then they will only stick around if they made something good. The good hands preflop will likely call your raise anyway and now you have an idea of what kinds of cards you are up against. You should at the very least raise 3 times the big blind to avoid the majority of junk hands coming in. If everyone folds and you win a small pot then so be it.

    Now if someone has already raised 3 times the blind then you can just smooth call and let them try and take down the pot after the flop and stick it to em.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I myself never slow play a big hand for two reasons, number one is that if you limp and get a lot of callers your hand is not a huge favorite anymore. And number two is that if you let a player limp and he flops a hand like two pair, you will be going broke, and he most likely wouldn't have called another nickle off if you had raised it, but since you slow played he got to see a free flop with his 2-4, and now the flop has come out 2-4-9 and you go broke.Also by just limping in, What have you learned about what kind of hand they have. I like to put a raise and see where i am at pre-flop, so if the board comes out bad, i know where my hand is. The only place i would ever slow play my aces would be on the button, with maniacs in the blinds. If i knew i would get a re-raise from a nut, then i might slow play, but overall it is a bad idea, A pair of aces is still only one pair, and the average winning hand in hold em is two pair so it's not as strong as it looks.

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  • 1 decade ago

    It's always good to look at your hole cards and see pocket of KK or AA. Two different thoughts should come to your mind: 1. Get paid with it. And 2. Not getting burned with it. You never slow play big hands! By betting pre-flop you first narrow the field, and you want to make it expensive for your opponents. And even if you don't receive any or only small action, it's better than having your monster be cracked. Keep in mind that even the 72 offsuit will beat the AA's 12.5% of the time. Suited connectors and small pairs are the "enemies" cards against Big pair. Big pocket pair are hard to play compare to a small pair. You know that if there is a dangerous flop and 2 players calling or even re-raise you, you can get away from your small pair if you didn't hit big. Can you do the same with the bullets? My advice: Don't slow play, and don't go broke with one pair, there are the best starting hands pre-flop, but post-flop.....They're just a pair. So post flop you want to proceed with caution. Making a good "continuation bet" post-flop is good to taste the water. Depending on the style of your opponent(s), the size of his chips stack, his (their) reaction to your bet, if it's a cash games, early, middle or late tournaments....You might even want to take the pot right now.

    Take care

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  • 1 decade ago

    Well first of all i look at my position preflop. If i am the first to act i just call and hope that some1 will bet for me. Then i will make a big reraise and hopefully make it heads up. I usuually do this when i am 3 seats or less from the small blind in a full 9 player game. However if you are in late position and no1 has bet you need to raise 3-6 times the big blind.

    Another important factor is who is in your table. If it is just a bunch of tight people, then you need to raise in any position, But if u're in a game with maniacs slow play them. Your oppenent will just keep betting and you can just call every time.

    Remember pocket aces and pocket kings usually win small pots and lose big 1's.

    Edit: I notice every1 is saying not to slowplay, but once ina while its good to change it up a little. Plus Doyle Brunson says to limp in early position and put in a big reraise in Super System.

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  • 1 decade ago

    i think it depends on the types of players you're up against, the number of players already in the hand, and the amount of your chipstack and your opponents' in comparison to the blinds

    if you're against a calling station who just calls down every pot, you're obviously better off getting a lot of money in while you're a big favorite and take your chances on the flop...likewise, if you're up against someone who you know is not likely to call a raise, then you're better off setting the trap and just calling

    the more opponents you have that have already entered the pot, the more often you have to raise...if three or four people have limped in in front of you, then you basically have no choice but to raise and just pray to be called, because you don't want to take the flop five or six ways with a big pair...if you'd be the first one to enter, then you can decide based on your opponents and the chipstacks whether or not to raise or just limp and set the trap, or if one person has limped in front of you, you could limp if you feel like they wouldn't call a raise, or if someone behind you will put in a big raise for you trying to pick up the dead money

    the more chips you and your opponents have, the more room you have to be creative...if you only have 10x the big blind or so you probably just have to push with your aces and hope someone wakes up with something, or if your opponents are short-stacked, then it's not even worth it to possibly give them a cheap flop...however, if you and your opponents are deep-stacked, then you have the freedom to decide what the best play is

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  • Jason
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    dude, for me aces and kings get cracked almost like 50 percent of the time online. so you better careful. Good player would call u like 9 7 suited and they will cracked your aces and kings easily if they hit, so bet hard. Usually u make less money from aces and kings then crap hand.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    slow is the correct aggressive play. pair of aces against 9 players is about 50/50 to win everybodies money........ tight aggressive you make a large bet or move all in and make someone pay to play

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  • 1 decade ago

    depends on your position.

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