Anonymous

Was what happened to Native Americans in the West a Genocide perpetrated by Americans? why or why not?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    There are many instances of the genocide of all Native Americans in the United States. The ignorance of anglo historians pride the victory of historical massacres in today's modern educational teachings. History books describe the Trail of Tears and Wounded Knee, but the truth is they don't tell the before or after of these great events in Native American history. If all the random raids and unjustified deaths of all the tribes were gathered and put on a timeline the whole world would see that the United States government wanted to rid the land of these "savages". Nonetheless, later in history after the land was acquired by the government, the Missionaries came in and continued on with the slow genocide of the Native Americans.

    ~The dismantling of Lakota society - characterized by the 1890 massacre of 350 men, women and children at Wounded Knee - resulted directly in the mass of the populace being overcome by alienation, insecurity and malnutrition endemic to the new world order. Compounded by the turn-of-the-century tuberculosis epidemic, a widespread biological and cultural collapse took place.

    ~The Pequot War was the first major conflict between European colonist-settlers and the Native people of what was to become the United States of America; and it ended on May 26, 1637, when Capt. John Mason and his forces torched the Pequot village at Mystic in a circle of fire, slaughtering up to 700 men, women and children.

    ~Navajos signed the Treaty of 1868 in the prison camp of Bosque Redondo. When they returned to their homeland that year with their stories and their legacy, they left behind brothers, sisters, fathers and mothers who were murdered, starved or dead from disease. Remember the dark years of 1863 - '68 when the Trail of Tears became an icon on Native American history. During those years, 9,000 Navajo and Apache were imprisoned here and 3,000 died of starvation and disease.

    ~.......In thinking about the encounter between American Indians and Euro-Americans, the question is one of means: How were American Indian lands taken? The answer is not, as it turns out, by military force. The wars, massacres, Geronimo and Sitting Bull - all that was really just cleanup. The real conquest was on paper, on maps and in laws. What those maps showed and those laws said was that Indians had been "conquered" merely by being "discovered." As put by Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall in the famous case of Johnson v. McIntosh, "[h]owever extravagant the pretension of converting the discovery of an inhabited country into conquest may appear, if the principle has been asserted in the first instance ... if a country has been acquired and held under it; ... it becomes the law of the land, and cannot be questioned." -- an excerpt from Indian Country journalist McSLoy (http://indiancountry.com/content.cfm?id=1094830044

    ~Destructive missionary work was further intensified through the boarding schools in which Indian children were forced to be isolated away from the nurturance of their own families. They were forced to undergo a vicious socialization process that was intended to, in the infamous words of Col. Pratt, ''Kill the Indian, save the man.'' children, were forced to put their tongue on dry ice so that the top layer of skin was peeled off their tongue for the ''crime'' of speaking their own indigenous language. Others were forced to kneel for long periods of time with bare legs on pieces of sharp broken tile until their knees bled. Still others were beaten viciously with leather straps and burned with cigarettes. Sexual abuse was common. An unknown number of children died of diseases.

    As you can see throughout history the massacre on Native Americans was pure genocide...I suggest you google: "Native American resistance", you'll find alot more than what history books offer.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Since "what happened to Native Americans" in the West began with the Spanish, perhaps it was not a Genocide perpetrated by "Americans."

  • Fr. Al
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    YES! Big time and long term, the removal of 1837-38 was just the tip of the iceberg. Blankets from smallpox victims given to peaceful "Indians" would certainly sound like intended genocide to me. Starvation on reservations likewise. That these weren't 100% effective make them not less genocidal. When Lincoln, as a militia captain came upon one of his soldiers killing children in the Black Hawk wars, the soldier said, "Kill the nits and you'll not have lice."

    Which is worse, one who kills the body or one who steals the soul? The mission schools and institutes children were forced to attend denied native culture and languages, in a major sense killing the soul of the people. What would we say if English people were forced to speak Cree? They're the immigrants after all. Could you see Washington or Jefferson in an otter cap and ribboned formal native dress? What if pre-schoolers and first graders were forced to learn about the Green Corn Maiden, and told that their creation stories and belief in Christ were myths and lies not to be believed by civilized people? Would this not be seen as a form of cultural genocide?

  • 1 decade ago

    It was a purposeful genocide, planned and executed by the American government at the time, ie Stonewall Jackson. They murdered the indigenous Americans for gold, for land, for anything. The Americans were very much like the Nazis in that. Fascists with a license to kill.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Actually there are many nations and tribes left in the West, I live close to the No. Cheyenne and Crow, and believe me there are a lot of them, many of them were simply "absorbed" into other cultures. But they still do not like the "white man"

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Of course it was. Isn't the reduction of a people's numbers to make them more manageable by others called that?

    In the case of some races, it may have been referred to as 'Euthanasia', but the action is the same.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No it was not a genocide.

    1. they still exist today and have a culture, there isn't much of them left though admittably

    2. Their numbers were lost because of wars that they willingly participated in. Slaughters of innocents and christians were common place in their society, just as it was common place for christians to do the same to them.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    of course not. in fact, most natives died from disease not violence. people also forget that natives often raided villages and scalped innocent men, women, and children. there was violence on both sides and it was wrong. it was a war over land...one side won, the other lost.

    edit: hyper is a moron. stonewall jackson died during the civil war and was not part of the government. she probably means andrew jackson. god help our youth!

  • 1 decade ago

    yes it was. we came through, took their land and pretty much their freedom, slaughtered them like pigs... yeah, i'd say our forefathers suck for that. our country has invaded other countries for doing less....

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes, absolutely, and it should be taught that way.

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