Would a solar powered light bulb work?

my insane younger brother came up with the idea that if you got a high wattage light bulb and powered it with solar pannels, then put them close together, they would power each other. WOULD THIS WORK? (and yes im serious dat my lil bro came up with it (it's part of his plan to take over the world))

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Indeed it would work.... And if your brother does succeed with his idea (.... cough) please tell me as it would power itself because as well from getting energy from the sun it would get it from itself.

    I would think that it would work the same as the garden solar powered lights you can buy... (Yes some people have tried the same idea).

    In the mean time though I would suggest buying a solar panel to fit onto your roof to then generate electricity to all electric appliances throughout your home. You should be very happy that whilst planning to take over the world (that I now want Jamaica and Italy (I like pizza) if he succeeds :-) lol ) –he is thinking greener!!!

    Though I think that it would not work in winter in Britain, as we NEVER hardly get any sunlight. For further information (on how solar power works- NOT the climate of Britain) see websites below.

  • 1 decade ago

    A cool idea. Theoretically, if you have a light connected to a solar panel, and you focus the light back onto the solar panel, the panel puts out more energy so the light should get brighter, putting more energy into the solar panel, producing more light. It probably would work, but due to various inefficiencies already discussed, and others too numerous to mention, there would be a limit to how bright the light would get. You might be able to measure the difference, but it would be small.

    Think of it this way. A solar panel absorbs light and converts it to electricity. If you focused all the light from the bulb back onto the solar panel, you would get some extra electricty out that you could use to light another light, but you have lost the light from the first bulb because it all went back into the solar panel. So you don't have any more light. In fact you would have a lot less because of the losses to heat described above.

    Besides that all the lights would go out when the sun went down or when it got cloudy. This is a big problem with solar power.

    Your brother has a creative mind, which is great, but he has a lot to learn about how the real world works. Encourage him to learn.

  • 4 years ago

    Sadly no the efficiency's and power losses with in the system would mean the bulb would soon go out! however putting a solar panel on the roof and a low energy l.e.d (Light Emitting Diode) bulb would run all day long! (well until it get dark any way!) you need to add a battery to get a light that work at night!

  • 1 decade ago

    Sadly no the efficiency's and power losses with in the system would mean the bulb would soon go out! however putting a solar panel on the roof and a low energy l.e.d (Light Emitting Diode) bulb would run all day long! (well until it get dark any way!) you need to add a battery to get a light that work at night!

    but love you little brothers Green thinking together we can save the world !!;-)

    Source(s): Electrician + green freek !
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  • 1 decade ago

    Nope. Because the assumption that you make is that they would all operate at 100% of the required energy.

    Step back. I attach a battery operated 5 watt output motor to rotate a 100 watt generator, thereby producing 100 watts of energy. Now connect that 100W generator to a 500W one, then to a 1000W one, and up and up, and suddenly, theoretically, I can produce all the energy I need for an entire city by hooking up a 5W toy motor. It won't work.

    In general, modern motors/generators are much more efficient than they were in the past. But, 80% of a light bulb's energy is given off as heat NOT light (pick one up a second after you turn it off and you will see what I mean.) So, 100% energy out, 20% energy returned. It will work for about three seconds.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There is never a free lunch when it comes to energy. First of all, not all of the light coming from the light bulb would hit the solar panel, so some of the energy escapes from this loop. Second, when the light bulb converts the electrical energy to light, some of the energy gets converted (lost) to heat. Third, when the light bulb converts the light to electricity, the process is not 100% efficient and even more heat is created.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Light Bulb Would Work, But There Is No Free Lunch.

    Interesting Idea Though

  • 1 decade ago

    Technically yes, depending on the type of light bulb your brother uses.

    Solar panels use UV light to charge and this is the type of light you would find in a sunbed tube though probably not a standard light.

    Ultimately, it would come down to being able to charge the solar panel enough from the lights to keep the light bright enough.

  • 1 decade ago

    Basically no! Because no device is 100% efficient, the light from the bulb would not provide enough energy to power itself.

  • Eva
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Yes, but why? If you've got the light-bulb, you've already got more electricity than you will get out of the solar panel.

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