Can anyone tell me the English translation of Rammstein's - Du Hast?

Update:

I would like to know the whole song please.

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  • 1 decade ago
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    The whole song is a play on German wedding vows.

    The refrain ("Willst du, bis der Tod euch scheidet, treu ihr sein für alle Tage?") roughly translates, "Do you want to remain faithful to her for all days, until death separates you?" Instead of answering with "ja" (yes), the singer says "nein" (no), finally answering the question to which he replied "nothing" earlier in the song ("du hast mich gefragt, und ich hab nichts gesagt", which translates, "You asked me, and I said nothing"). As stated earlier, the English version of Du Hast is not translated, but changed altogether

    The title is commonly interpreted as "You Have," but can be considered as a play on words: "Du hast" means 'you have', while the homophonous "du hasst" means 'you hate'. The pun is illustrated by a comparison of the German version, a literal English translation, and the band's non-literal English version of the song.

    The repeating wedding vow is sung incompletely at first, with subtle ironic meanings:

    Du - You

    Du hast - You have (you hate)

    Du hast mich - You have me (you hate me)

    Du hast mich gefragt - You have asked me

    Du hast mich gefragt und ich hab nichts gesagt - You have asked me and I've said nothing

    As often with Rammstein songs, slight modifications reveal more of the intentions of the lyrics.

    Willst du, bis der Tod euch scheidet, treu ihr sein für alle Tage?"

    In English, "Will you, until death divides you, be faithful to her for all days?" The song thus reveals that a man has been asked by a woman to marry her. This is repeated three times.

    Willst du, bis zum Tod, der scheide, sie lieben auch in schlechten Tagen?"

    If the line is read as "Tod der Scheide" it would be "until the death of the vagina" and not "until death, which would separate" ("Tod, der scheide").

    Finally, the final three words are skipped, resulting in the meaning, "Will you be faithful to her?"

  • 1 decade ago

    Du hast mich gefragt.

    Literal translation: You asked me.

    Matt B. is a little confused. "Du haßt mich" would mean "You hate me". However, if you listen to the song, you'll notice that it's not put in that context.

  • 1 decade ago

    You

    You have

    You have me

    You

    You have

    You have me

    You

    You have

    You have me

    You

    You have

    You have me

    You

    You have

    You have me

    You have me

    You have me and ask

    You have me and ask

    You have me and ask and I have nothing to say

    Will you until death does sever,

    be upright to her forever?

    No!

    No!

    Will you until death does sever,

    be upright to her forever?

    No!

    No!

    Du

    Du hast

    Du hast mich

    Du

    Du hast

    Du hast mich

    Du

    Du hast

    Du hast Mich

    Du hast Mich

    Du hast Mich gefragt

    Du hast Mich gefragt

    Du hast Mich gefragt und hab ich nichts gesagt

    Will you until death does sever,

    be upright to her forever?

    No!

    No!

    Will you 'til death be her rider

    Her lover to, to stay inside her?

    No!

    No!

    Will you until death does sever,

    be upright to her forever?

    Never!

    Never!

    ^^

    Source(s): www.sing365.com
  • 1 decade ago

    yes du hast mish dis gard or whatever he says means:

    i like to motorboat tities.

    just kidding but good look my fellow raimstien fan

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Basically it means "you hate me"

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