Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsGeography · 1 decade ago

About Mount Everest?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    MOUNT EVEREST is the highest mountain in the world that measures 29,028 ft. (8,848 m.) high. It is located at the border of Nepal and China (Tibet) in the Himalayas.

    For more info about Mt. Everest, here are some links:

    http://www.mounteverest.net/

    http://www.panoramas.dk/fullscreen2/full22.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Everest

    http://www.nationalgeographic.com/everest/

    For pictures of the mountain, here's Yahoo! Image Search:

    http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=...

  • 1 decade ago

    Mount Everest is the highest mountain in the world. It rises about 9 kilometres above sea level. Everest is one of the mountains that make up the Himalaya, on the frontiers of Tibet and Nepal, north of India.

    Surveyors disagree on the exact height of Mount Everest. A British government survey in the middle 1800's set the height at 8,840 metres. The 1954 Indian government survey set the present official height at 8,848 metres. But a widely used unofficial figure is 8,882 metres.

    Mount Everest was named after Sir George Everest (1790-1866), a British surveyor general of India. Tibetans call Mount Everest Chomolungma. Nepalese call the mountain Sagarmatha.

    Mount Everest is, geologically, a relatively young mountain, formed from folded limestone rock that is still being forced slowly upward by the movement of land masses below it. Ice sheets cover the sides of the mountain, although the summit, peaks, and ridges are kept clear by strong winds.

    Source(s): THE WORLD BOOK
  • 1 decade ago

    the highest mountain in the world at 8,848 metres.

  • Mick
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Another excellent site: http://www.everestnews.com/

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  • 1 decade ago

    All you need to know:

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