The deepest parts of the ocean are about 10 km below the surface. What is the pressure there (in atm)? (1 atm?

The deepest parts of the ocean are about 10 km below the surface. What is the pressure there (in atm)? (1 atm = 1.01*10^5 Pa, density of water (rho) = 1000 kg/m^3)

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The Mariana Trench is the deepest known marine trench (maximum depth of 10.9 km), and the deepest location in the Earth's crust itself.

    It is located in the western North Pacific Ocean, southeast of the Mariana Islands.

    A US Navy bathyscaphe called Trieste reached the bottom on January 23, 1960 and measured the water pressure as 1086 bar. This is over 1000 times the standard atmospheric pressure at sea level of 1bar.

  • 5 years ago

    First, I never can quite understand why everyone gets bugs in their pants about the "missing heat." The heat is going somewhere. Either out into space or into the oceans. We just have to figure out where and have the tools (and it was the lack of tools which trembath considered to be the tragedy) to verify. Nailing the energy balance is only a secondary corroboration of the general warming trend. It is nice to have to satisfy some of the naysayers and it helps verify climate models. That said using the thermal expansion of water is a reasonable way to deduce the temperature rise in the icy depth. Hard to get enough data points otherwise. So yes, this indicates the depths as the sink for the missing heat, but in of itself, I don't think the paper, based on the abstract, is sufficient. It needs to be corroborated.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Pressure in water increases by about 1 atmosphere every 10 meters.

    So, at 10km the pressure is about 1,000 atmospheres (1,000 kg/sq cm).

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    aufwiedersehen im ‘voting’ meine Herren !

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