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What is the difference between a Division 1 school and a Division 2 school???

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    This link answers your question...even includes info on Division III

    What's the difference between Divisions I, II and III?

    Division I

    Division I member institutions have to sponsor at least seven sports for men and seven for women (or six for men and eight for women) with two team sports for each gender. Each playing season has to be represented by each gender as well. There are contest and participant minimums for each sport, as well as scheduling criteria. For sports other than football and basketball, Division I schools must play 100 percent of the minimum number of contests against Division I opponents -- anything over the minimum number of games has to be 50 percent Division I. men's and women's basketball teams have to play all but two games against Division I teams; for men, they must play one-third of all their contests in the home arena. Schools that have football are classified as Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) or NCAA Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). Football Bowl Subdivision schools are usually fairly elaborate programs. Football Bowl Subdivision teams have to meet minimum attendance requirements (average 15,000 people in actual or paid attendance per home game), which must be met once in a rolling two-year period. NCAA Football Championship Subdivision teams do not need to meet minimum attendance requirements. Division I schools must meet minimum financial aid awards for their athletics program, and there are maximum financial aid awards for each sport that a Division I school cannot exceed.

    Division II

    Division II institutions have to sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women, (or four for men and six for women), with two team sports for each gender, and each playing season represented by each gender. There are contest and participant minimums for each sport, as well as scheduling criteria -- football and men's and women's basketball teams must play at least 50 percent of their games against Division II or Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) or Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA) opponents. For sports other than football and basketball there are no scheduling requirements. There are not attendance requirements for football, or arena game requirements for basketball. There are maximum financial aid awards for each sport that a Division II school must not exceed. Division II teams usually feature a number of local or in-state student-athletes. Many Division II student-athletes pay for school through a combination of scholarship money, grants, student loans and employment earnings. Division II athletics programs are financed in the institution's budget like other academic departments on campus. Traditional rivalries with regional institutions dominate schedules of many Division II athletics programs.

    Division III

    Division III institutions have to sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women, with two team sports for each gender, and each playing season represented by each gender. There are minimum contest and participant minimums for each sport. Division III athletics features student-athletes who receive no financial aid related to their athletic ability and athletic departments are staffed and funded like any other department in the university. Division III athletics departments place special importance on the impact of athletics on the participants rather than on the spectators. The student-athlete's experience is of paramount concern. Division III athletics encourages participation by maximizing the number and variety of athletics opportunities available to students, placing primary emphasis on regional in-season and conference competition.

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  • 4 years ago

    Division 1 Schools

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  • 4 years ago

    1

    Source(s): 100% Success Winning Predictor - http://WinningPicks.oruty.com/?SbM
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  • 4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/axgKc

    Texas does high school football in a quirky way when it comes to the playoffs. Classes 4A and 5A don't have Division 1 and Division 2 alignments until the playoff brackets are determined. For 5A, the top 4 teams in each district qualify for the playoffs. Of those 4, the 2 schools with the largest student enrollment are placed into the 5A Division 1 bracket and the 2 schools with the lowest student enrollments are placed into the 5A Division 2 bracket. For 4A, the top 3 teams in each district qualify for the playoffs with the school with the highest enrollment going into 4A Division 1 bracket and the other 2 going into the 4A Division 2 bracket. Having the best record doesn't matter. Depending on enrollment, the district winner can end up in Division 2 if they have a lower enrollment than the other schools. Yes, it's screwy. For one, 4 teams qualifying for the playoffs is way too many. In some districts, teams with 3 or 4 wins can get a playoff spot. And, a school can be put into the Division 1 bracket one year, and the next put into division 2, depending on which other schools in their district qualify for the playoffs. i didn't follow it all that close but I remember the debate when the Texas UIL switched to the 2 division bracket alignments for the playoffs. Supposedly, it was done this way to avoid adding a 6A classification for the larger schools. Texas certainly has enough high enrollment schools to justify a 6A class. It might work okay in the larger population centers with a lot of schools but it would be a problem for north and west Texas schools. For example, a proposed district included an El Paso school, an Amarillo school, a Lubbock school, an Odessa school, and 2 Dallas schools. It was determined that the cost of travel would be way to high to put districts like that together. The cost could probably be justified for district football games, but all the other sports would have to travel the same distances... basketball, volleyball, softball, etc, etc, etc. So, I can understand why they chose not to add a 6A classification but going to the 2 division playoff system seems like a strange alternative. The like below has links to the 2010 playoff brackets and to the UIL home page for more information about the playoff formats.

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What is the difference between a Division 1 school and a Division 2 school???

    Source(s): difference division 1 school division 2 school: https://bitly.im/uaNnt
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  • 1 decade ago

    It relates just to the sports program. Division 1 is the best, the sports games are often televised, the players most often make it to the major leagues after.

    If you're not an athlete though, there's really no difference.

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  • toff
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Often in is the size that differs. Even some larger schools have not developed their atheletic programs to the extent to compete with division one schools. Examples are Lipscomb and Belmont in Nashville, both of which had the size but not he program development to compete at D1 level. both schools have moved to D1 and are slowly becomming competitive.

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  • 4 years ago

    Lots of great answers already for this

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Hurrah, that's what I was looking for! Thanks to author of this question.

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