Is there a possibility that the moon falls to earth due to gravity?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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    the only chance of this happening is if the moon's velocity decreases.following the law of circular motion,a decrease in the moon's velicty will unbalance the orbital movement.thus, the moon will be attracted to the earth

  • 1 decade ago

    From what I understand, it's gravity that makes the moon 'fall' around the earth, just as the space shuttle - once its rockets get it into a high enough orbit - go into a 'free fall' around the earth because of gravity. As long as this earth stays the same same size and weight, I think the possibility that the moon will fall right into it is low, although I have actually dreamed of that happening! But in the dream, the moon turned out to be nothing but a beach ball :)

  • 1 decade ago

    No, based on current astronomy and astrophysics. The moon is in orbit - the gravitational pull by the earth balances the velocity of the moon and its want to shoot off into space. This is exactly the same principal of how the planets orbit the sun. The moon's velocity wants it to pull away from the earth. The earth's gravity maintains the moon's orbit. This is also how the shuttle traveling at 25,000 (or so) miles per hour maintains orbit. It is effectively falling as fast as the earth is spinning.

  • 1 decade ago

    If the Moon falls to Earth due to gravity, it could only happen if another large object impacted the Moon with sufficient force so as to slow its velocity. Then the Earth's gravity may affect it and decay the orbit as has happened to some satellites in Earth orbit.

    Since the Moon has been orbiting the Earth for millions of years, it's certainly not likely to happen in our lifetime.

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  • 1 decade ago

    No.

    As a matter of fact, gravity (combined with the Earth's faster rotation than the Moon's orbit, and the fact of tides) is causing the Moon to gradually move away from the Earth.  It isn't falling down, it's "falling" UP (at about 8/10 of an inch per year).

  • 1 decade ago

    Just as possible as the earth falling into the sun. The moon's velocity causes an acclerative force that counters the force of gravity. So the moon is constantly "falling", but as it falls, the earth has moved away. Artificial satellites work the same way.

  • 3 years ago

    a million. could the ISS and the moon fall to earth and supply up orbiting in the event that they there have been no longer accelerating forward? No. For an merchandise to proceed to be in orbit around the Earth, it has to maintain a velocity wherein its inertia could equivalent the impact of Earth's gravity. 2. and in case of the moon whats giving it forward acceleration? the rationalization the moon is accelerating is as a results of the fact it incredibly is being "pulled" through the bulge close to the equator. because of the fact that this bulge is moving on the comparable velocity because of the fact the Earth rotates, it incredibly is swifter than the fee that the moon is orbiting, it incredibly is inflicting the moon to develop up. it is likewise inflicting the moon to recede (turn away) from the Earth. The moon's gravitational impact is likewise inflicting the rotation of the Earth to sluggish. 3. we could say human grow to be left to drift in earths orbit, needless to say he would be falling, yet will he start to orbit besides, the forward momentum is it given through earths gravity? this relies upon upon the place the human grow to be while he grow to be left and wherein path he grow to be going at that factor. If the human grow to be already moving in direction of Earth, he could proceed to flow in direction of it and be sped up through the Earth's gravity. although, if he grow to be left previous the Roche decrease (approximately 14,000 miles above the Earth) and he grow to be moving faraway from the Earth, his inertia could equivalent or maybe exceed Earth's gravitational impact.

  • 1 decade ago

    No the moon cannot fall on the earth due to some reasons. According to Maxwells theory, only charged particles loose their energy as radiations when they rotate and collaspe as their speed decreases.

    Since moon is not a charged particle it does not loose its energy. Further, moon rotates around the earth, due to which the centripetal force and the electrostatic forces get cancelled. As both of these forces get cancelled, the moon only rotates on its orbit. (gravity and centripetal force are somewhat similar)

  • 1 decade ago

    Nope. The moon is already falling towards the Earth, except it is also moving not only downwards, but forwards as well, so what ends up happening is that it just keeps going around and around.

    Source(s): http://judochop.rocks.it I'm smart.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No, it's just the opposite.The Moon is actually slowly moving away from the Earth, about 1.5 inches per year.

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