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? asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 1 decade ago

What planet is less dense than water?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Saturn is the only planet less dense than water (about 30 percent less). If you can find an ocean huge enough, Saturn would actually float on it like a ball.

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  • NJGuy
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    If you fill a large bathtub with water and put Saturn into the water, the planet will float, proving that it is lighter (less dense) than the water. Only problem is that when you're done, you'll have rings around the tub!!! LOL

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  • 3 years ago

    Saturn is the only gas extensive (in our image voltaic device a minimum of) it fairly is way less dense than water. rather, gas giants are composed of two considerable sections: The center (dense) and the H+He envelope (no longer dense). The density of the planet as an entire relies upon on the ratio of those 2 that make up the planet.* desire this helps! *actual that's plenty extra complicated than this. The density may well be afflicted with the help of alternative factors collectively with temperature (as gases strengthen whilst that's warmer), and outer giants Neptune and Uranus are ice giants, which additionally will boost there density.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Saturn

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  • 1 decade ago

    The sixth planet from the sun and the second largest in the solar system, Saturn has captivated generations with its mystery and beauty.

    Saturn's oval shape is a result of its incredible rotation period of only 10 hours, 39 minuets. Saturn's atmosphere is composed primarily of hydrogen. In fact, the planet is less dense than water. The wind on Saturn is intense. While slower at higher latitudes, winds can reach speeds of over 1,100 miles an hour around the equator.

    While they appear solid, Saturn's rings are made up of many narrow ringlets. Much of this structure is a result of the gravitational forces of Saturn's many moons on the rings. While no one is certain of their composition it is know that they are made partly of water. The origin of the rings is also unknown, but it has been speculated that they are the remains of several larger moons destroyed by comets or asteroids.

    Saturn is home to eighteen moons ranging from captured asteroids to atmospheric words. Be sure to check them out.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Just Saturn

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Jupiter, Saturn.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Saturn *only*...! If you had a bathtub big enough to fit Saturn into it, Saturn would float.

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  • 22
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    saturn

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  • 1 decade ago

    saturn

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