Law asked in SportsOutdoor RecreationFishing · 1 decade ago

Alaska: Summer Fishing Job?

I currently live in South Dakota and attend South Dakota State University. I work on a farm when not in school. I was wondering if any novice fisherman or anyone who knows the ins and outs of the fishing world in Alaska could tell me about this job and where I can look for hiring? I do not need to hear the hard work aspect of it, I know it is demanding but I am not shy of hard work due to growing up on a farm. So if anyone can give me any help at all, I need an adventure and something new. I am tired of the stale routine of every summer working on the farm and then going back to school. I understand the money aspect can vary but this will be an experience that I could always remember. Any help, I would be most thankful. Thanks all.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I have worked for the Alaska railroad for 11 years. When I hired on, I wanted to see more of my state. I never thought it would be my career. The railroad hires about anyone who is healthy, can pass a drug test and pursues the position. Track workers start at 16 an hour with 85 $ per Diem. Working on the gangs is a lot of fun and hard work in the middle of nowhere. Working on a section crew is a lot less overtime, but that leaves you time for the fun stuff. Most of the foremen are outdoors men who work hard , shoot strait, and love hunting and fishing. There is a little of the normal big company b s , but the farther you get from the city, the less that is. They allow college students to take off in August and return in May. For an all round good Alaska experience with good guarantied pay, I would highly recommend it. Google it and jump through the hoops. I have no idea what they are.

    Commercial fishing is a very unpredictable job. If it goes well, you can make 30k or more in a summer. There are three variables. fish prices which fluctuate a lot. Fish quantities which fluctuate a lot. And your skipper's ability, safety, and work ethic which is for you a crapshoot. I wouldn't go on to any big processing boats. Starting out you want get on to any big money boats. 4% of gross is about normal for a new deckhand. Like I said 30 k would be a good estimate if everything went fairly good. The only thing about the work aspect is that when there is an opener , you fish. So you might have to work for a few days without any real sleep.

    Recreational guide fishing is a lot more low key, and less pay. Lodges hire sport fishermen to take clients out fishing each day. The lodge provides all expense, very good food and a bunk. They are in the wilderness, and may have several kidds working in various cooking to mechanicing type positions. This would also be a very enjoyable summer. A lot of the clients are rich, so they tip quite well. For this, I would just start looking up different fishing lodges and calling them up.

    Whatever you do , do it quick,look to be in Alaska woking by May. I do have some connections in any of these fields, so email if you want. Good luck

    Source(s): Cantwell section foreman
  • 4 years ago

    2

    Source(s): Online Surveys For Cash - http://onlinesurveys.iukiy.com/?DPTw
  • 1 decade ago

    Law,

    Getting on a Crab boat is the money maker, however expect ta' work your butt off and it is a VERY, VERY dangerous job for the "green hand", as far as that goes even the most experienced!!!!!! One can get on a Seining (best choice) Trolling or Gill netting boat, but generally the latter 2 are a one man operation depending on the size of the craft.

    Also, knowing someone that lives there is a BIG, BIG plus. Another thing about getting into commercial fishing is that the size catch is goin' to dictate deck hand share of profits. Something that a lot of people do not realize is that a certain % of monies taken in will go to the boat (gas, supplies for next season, boat repairs if any, etc..). Once again, by knowing someone is a + because they'll be able to tell ya' who catches fish and who does'nt. You can utilize your search bar and enter Alaksa commercial fishing jobs, also this site may help ya' out www.cf.adfg.state.ak.us

    It's a seasonal job (obviously) so if your adventure does happen (which I do hope) make sure it fits in with your school schedule. One other thing that I must point out is motion sickness. I know because my dad owned seiners and I found out the hard way ie., not turning the boat around for port because of a sick deck-hand : (... Believe me I'm not tryin' ta' discourage you, but just thought I'd give you an idea of what it is all about. Good luck to ya' and who knows ya' might not even want to come-back to the "lower 48"...

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Alaska: Summer Fishing Job?

    I currently live in South Dakota and attend South Dakota State University. I work on a farm when not in school. I was wondering if any novice fisherman or anyone who knows the ins and outs of the fishing world in Alaska could tell me about this job and where I can look for hiring? I do not need to...

    Source(s): alaska summer fishing job: https://tr.im/2C9vg
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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Work In Alaska Summer

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Working on the Alyeska pipeline in alaska is what alot of men do. You get paid soooo much money. You work 2 weeks straight and then you're off for two weeks.

    http://www.alyeska-pipe.com/default.asp

    Fishing is fun in alaska. I used to go halibut and black bass fishing when I lived there.

    Alaksa is so beautiful. If you like nature you will love it there. It's like a big campground.

  • 4 years ago

    Take Surveys Get Paid - http://onlinesurveys.uzaev.com/?qFUd

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    my old friend owns a catfish farm in nebraska just google catfish farms in nebraska

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    try for the crab fishing, they pay excellent

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