ohio speeding ticket?

Hello,

I have a good friend of mine who was "clocked" at 51 in a 35 zone today. The ticketing too place in Ohio, but the friend lives in PA. Now the officer was coming in the other lane and claims to have used Radar to clock it. The friend was only truthfully doing about 5 or 6 over the legal limit at the time, also, there were several cars in front of the vehicle. The ticket cost is over $300 and is causing financial difficulty. Is there anyone that can be done to get rid of the ticket?

Update:

Hello,

I have a good friend of mine who was "clocked" at 51 in a 35 zone today. The ticketing too place in Ohio, but the friend lives in PA. Now the officer was coming in the other lane and claims to have used Radar to clock it. The friend was only truthfully doing about 5 or 6 over the legal limit at the time, also, there were several cars in front of the vehicle. The ticket cost is over $300 and is causing financial difficulty. Is there anyone that can be done to get rid of the ticket? Also, I forgot to add before that apparently it is legal for Ohio cops to be traveling in the opposite direction. I don't see how the physics of it would work, but I guess by law they do.

5 Answers

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  • Kevin
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    A speeding ticket in Ohio over $300?????? Your friend got cited for some other things too, one mm violation would be between $90 and about $115 depending on the court costs for wherever they were cited.

    Radar works in both moving and stationary mode. A radar certified officer would have had to have a good visual on the car, be able to judge it's speed prior to activating the radar, and then know by how the radar responded that they were targeting the right car. It's not just push the button and write a ticket. If the officer believed it enough to write the ticket it's probably a good violation.

    Your friend can always have their day in court, never know what can happen. As far as how fast your friend thinks they were going, it could be a few different things here.

    1.) Your friend could be wrong or (sorry) lying.

    2.) Your friend's speedometer could be out of calibration

    3.) Your friend could have looked at their speed after they saw the officer, and have slowed down. But the officer may have clocked them hundreds of feet before the officer was spotted.

    One thing your friend (can we assume this is you) can do if the ticket is a financial difficulty; the court that issued the ticket would be more than willing to arrange payments for the ticket.

    Source(s): Police Officer, 10 years
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  • 1 decade ago

    Radar is only a tool to support our observations. I observe a vehicle speeding, estimate the speed and then verify my observation with my Radar or Lidar. I actually do not need my radar to write a speeding ticket, but every tool helps. Tell your friend to pay the ticket. If he shows up in court the judge may even let him make payments.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    sorry but the radar in the units are very good and they work both in front of the car and behind the car, both for cars going in either direction.

    So obvioiusly your friend was going faster at some point then they thought they were.

    He can either pay the ticket or travel back to Ohio to contest the ticket. But he will need an attorney if he has any chance of all at beating it.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I don't know how the physics works either, but the people that design the radar guns do. You admit your friend was speeding. Reducing the charge from 16 mph over the limit to 6 mph is probably won't save enough to bother.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I do believe that a cop can not be moving in the opposite direction to catch someone on radar. I would find out and see if you can challenge it in court. Look up some Ohio law, maybe the cop thinks that they can get away with it it was someone out of state.

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