Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesVisual ArtsPainting · 1 decade ago

Is painting an intellectual activity?

Can anyone make a description of a exploration activity, such as: water, sand, clay, dough or other materials or cooking?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Any activity can be an intellectual activity depending on the thought put into it.

    Your second question depends a lot on what you want to get out of the activity and the age-group involved.

    In the absence of that information I'll assume this is for your own benefit for means of learning to think in a new or different way and that you are a teenager or adult.

    Really any material or medium you choose is fine. I suggest one that simply appeals to you most. Maybe it's sand because it's non-traditional, paints because the way the colours flow, or clay for how it feels in you hands. Which ever choose it because it has some interest to you other than just that of a means to an end.

    First just play with it for a while. Don't think about it just let your mind wander and get yourself relaxed and comfortable with the medium. Swirl paint on your paper or canvas, make squigglies, roll the clay around in your hands, squish it and mash it, whatever, just feel it and let it be and go with it.

    Then give yourself a subject. Don't paint a duck because people paint ducks. Try making an abstract concept. Use clay to give shape to the colour purple without using any actual colours (well, other than the natural colour of the clay but don't rely on that). Paint emotions without people, animals, or words. Use sand to make air. Make a cake that represents sorrow. Come up with more ideas on your own.

    Try to keep your art work as free form and abstract as you can. Place absolutely no value on what it looks like or how it turns out. It simply can't be bad, poorly done, perfect, brilliant or whatever. Save that for developing the actual talent to paint. This has nothing to do with talent or ability. You can't possibly do it wrong. Even if you decide your sculpture of purple doesn't really feel like purple you still did it right.

    The purpose is to learn to let go of the limits of common definitions and develop your ability to think creatively and express what you think and feel. At first you'll find it difficult to let go of your definitions for whatever concept you choose but, with time, it'll come more and more easily. That's a sign that you are learning to think differently. You will actually be creating new neural pathways in your brain.

    The gain is that the more you do activities like this the more you'll be able to approach problems in life differently, to see things from a new perspective.

    It can (and should) also be a really great way to relax and unwind. If it becomes frustrating just set it aside and try it again another time or with another approach.

    Hope that was what you were looking for and, above all, have fun!

  • 1 decade ago

    Is painting an intellectual activity? You're damn right it is!

    Try working eight hours a day on one piece, and at the end of your shift you're going to find that all the thinking you've had to do on the work has taken it's toll on your brain. It is exhausting. The average man/woman in the public seem to think that it is a lackadaisical past time for the talented!

    It isn't. It is hard work. You really have to think about what you are doing.

    The rest of your question I don't fully understand. But I think you are asking for a tactile medium to work with. I would say clay. In that medium you are using water, and heat, you can use colour in the firing of the work, and you can incorporate other mediums into your work. Such as glass, extra sand, or some organic piece after the firing.

    Try an exploration of clay. There is more that one type of clay to work with. You can use two or three different clays on one work or just explore the variables of each type.

    Just know that whatever you pick you are going to have to think about it, or end up frustrated at the poor results.

    Hope you find what you are looking for.

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Why what a fantastic question, It absolutely IS! Painting requires an advanced method of understanding and creating sense.

    Have you considered studying the works of contemporary artists? To name a select few contemporary painters to explore : Jeff Koons, Jenny Holzer, Joe Papagoda, Angela Gegg.

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