Is multiculturalism bad for national identity?

Why do we draw distinctions (African-American, Chinese-American, ect.)? Should we not all consider ourselves as Americans? I am not talking about honoring your heritage because I do believe this is acceptable and important, but the national identity should be of a single united people. Do you believe there is a danger that national identity can be lost through run away multicultural ideals?

This question is aimed at Americans, but I would welcome international opinions as well. I am particularly interested in whether these labels are used in other societies and cultures.

If this question sounds even remotely racist let me assure you from the start that it is not intended as such.

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  • 1 decade ago
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    I believe that multiculturalism is what we are. We are a mutt nation. But, with that said, I believe that when the government draws distinctions between us, they actually keep us divided.

    We're supposed to be a Meritocracy, so when the government favors one over another, they cause one to feel discriminated against.

    Illegal immigrants throw another wrench into the gear, because they are not Americans. They have not taken any oath of allegiance to this country. They obviously, in many cases, remain loyal to their homeland.

  • 1 decade ago

    What is the national identity of Americans? In a country that, compared to other countries, has a relatively short but busy history it has been relatively the same since our original settlers. One of the things that has been push on us in history classes is the fact that America is a melting pot and our identity is rooted on being able to call yourself anything you want and being free to live a lifestyle that is your personal choice. Politics has interfered with this right by forcing beliefs upon us but our essential freedoms remain. We are the land of the free and the home of the brave. Whether I am called Black, Chinese-American, or just plain American does not take anything away from the freedoms that our founding fathers fought and died to procure.

  • 1 decade ago

    Why can't having a multi-cultural population be an identity in itself? Although there is arguably a stereotypical American image that is present throughout the world, I'm sure that if you asked people to really describe what is "American," you would probably get a variety of answers. I think that the fact that there are some many different cultures that thrive in the same country is what makes this country unique and why so many people from different countries choose to make the United States their home.

  • 1 decade ago

    it's called too much political correctness. everyone is afraid of insulting someone else. the last statement you made is the point i'm trying to make. why would you need to say that? i think people do it, not realizing they do it. you are exactly right, it is a bad thing. we are supposed to be ONE nation of AMERICANS. not african-american, chinese-american, so on and so on. i agree it's important to keep your heritage and be proud of it. i myself am half Cherokee. when people use terms like that, it separates us. that's not what i want. and i think most people would agree. it just might not be politically correct. =)

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    As citizens of the United States, we don't really have a "national identity" in the sense you are speaking. We are a nation of immigrants - everyone, except the native Indians, are from somewhere else - or their ancestors are. This makes for the most diverse country in the world. That is what makes us special - our diversity.

    E Pluribus Unum.....is it true in our country.

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    "multiculturalism" desires to be understood from the two an historic and a conceptual perspective. i'm hostile to this unfavorable coverage. i've got faith that ethical judgment is mandatory to existence. a manner of existence that values freedom, progression, reason and technology, case in point, is powerful; one that values oppression, stagnation, mysticism, and lack of information isn't.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Multiculturalism is anathema to national identity.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Only for isolationists and bigots.

    TFTP

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