My boss gave me a $5 raise. How do I say "Thanks"?

I'll be graduating in 3 months, so I'm pretty sure they gave me the raise to get me to stick around after I graduate. $20/hour isn't exactly what I want to end up at, but it's not bad for someone who is still in college.

My question is, am I supposed to thank the owner for the raise? If so, what do I say? By thanking him am I indicating that I plan on staying there after graduation, because I'm not sure I want to. I really want to try to get into MIT.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Show him you appreciate his confidence in you by continuing to do a job well done. Tell him you appreciate his confidence in you. ;)

  • 1 decade ago

    In general you don't "thank" your boss for a raise. I am guessing when you were told, you did say thank you and didn't just sit there and say nothing. I would say the best thanks is to give 100% off your effort on the job. Even if it's short term, your hard work will benefit your employer and be a great thank you. I do wonder however why you're saying only 3 months....If you haven't applied to MIT you certainly aren't going to be able to start there in 3 months. Before you decide to leave, why don't you get all your ducks in a row. Get your applications done, your financial aid forms filled out. If going to MIT involves moving do the leg work for that (search out housing options, travel costs, etc). If MIT is close to where you live, consider talking to your boss about continuing to work part time while you attend MIT. If you are valuable to them, it may be worth their inconvenience to have you stay on, even part time. I worked 1 weekend a month (thurs-Sun) at a Real Estate Broker's office doing the books while I was in college. I worked 40 hours in that one weekend and it was great for them, because I balanced the monthly books and paid all the bills in one weekend, and then the rest of the time I focused on School. There are always options. One more thing, be sure to get a good letter of recommendation from your boss. It's always beneficial to have a great letter of reference on hand. Be sure to make copies, too, so that you don't have to go back and ask for another letter. Best of luck to you.

  • 1 decade ago

    If you want to say thank you, there should not really be any implication in your thanks, and you should just do it - either verbally, or by doing something from the heart, eg baking a cake, or making a casserole - or maybe remembering if your boss likes something, and making the effort to get him that (it doesn't have to cost you a penny - could be a fresh picked daisy, or taping a song he likes off the radio).

    Your boss has acknowledged the hard work you have put in - by thanking him, you are returning his acknowledgment, and therefore giving him reason to believe his choice of increasing your wage was the right one.

    But by thanking someone, it doesn't mean you are then bound in that job. In the world of work, people understand that staff move on, and that a dynamic and changing workforce is good for business - I don't think he will be angry if you move on - if anything he can get someone to do your job for less money!!! (",)

    Source(s): Me - I'm a boss!
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    $20 per hour is nothing to sneeze at. Almost every college grad I know has had to settle for less than $10 per hour. Some of the most educated people I know make $8.00 per hour. I really would not be so upset about $20/hr.

    Case in point...the radio station where my fiance works was just interviewing for a news room position. A kid right out of college came in for an interview and straight up asked for $35,000 per year. It was all the business manager could do to not laugh in the poor guy's face. Although I agree the position should definitely pay more, it started at $7.50/hour. People need to be a little more realistic.

    I digress.

    As for thanking your boss, yes you definitely should. It was a kind gesture, and one that he did not need to make. A professional thank you card would be sufficient. Point out that you are glad he realizes how much you do for the company, and you appreciate his gesture.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    just stop by the office and say thank you in person- something like thank you for my recent raise and I really appreciate the opportunity you have gave me with this organization. have a nice day.

    $20 an hour is pretty good money although it depends on the COL in your area...will you go to MIT immediately and what is your plan if you dont get in. I would apply to MIT and keep working and then if you get in you give them plenty of notice and tell them you have to quit to go to MIT.

    BOL

  • 1 decade ago

    'Thanks' aren't really required when you get a raise. If you have worked hard and you deserve it then you can just accept it and move forward. A simple verbal thank you might show that you appreciate the raise but it isn't required by any means. I wouldn't worry about a thank you implying any sense of commitment. I am sure your boss understands where you are at in life and doesn't expect you to make this a career if you still have goals to get into MIT. Just say 'thanks' and move on. Congrats on the raise!

  • 1 decade ago

    How to thank the boss depends a lot if you work in more formal or informal environment.

    Probably a sincere "Thank you" if you have a minute alone would do. If you feel valued and you are happy about it - then tell him so. I do not think that this will presume that you are planning to stay but being polite and grateful will encourage your employer to make such raises and gestures.

  • 1 decade ago

    You seem to very bright and have a good work ethic. $20/hr for a student still in college is not bad at all based on the market where you are.

    Just be polite and say "Thank You". It is a very good place to start. You are not indicating anything but thank you. Why are we in this day and age so afraid to be simply 'polite'?

    Your employer is not paying for your education, so what is the problem?

  • 1 decade ago

    It is always appropriate to say thank you. It doesn't imply anything except good manners and gratitude. Naturally you don't expect to stay forever in the same job you have after getting out of college. And if they did give you a raise to try to keep you, that's a nice thing. But it doesn't obligate you to stay. And Thank you notes or cards are NOT appropriate in this situation---getting a raise is not a social event.

  • 1 decade ago

    The raise isn't a bribe, it's his way of saying 'thank you' for the work you're doing. All you have to do is work like you deserve it. Good luck with MIT!

  • 1 decade ago

    I'm not sure why you think that by thanking him you are saying you want to stay. They are two completely separate issues. Yes, he may have given you the raise in order to try and keep you on, but it doesn't seem like you have any proof of that unless he told you outright. Just send him a nice thank you note and let him know that you appreciate it greatly.

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