please, explain the difference between QUICK and FAST.?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    quick (kwĭk)

    adj., quick·er, quick·est.

    Moving or functioning rapidly and energetically; speedy.

    Learning, thinking, or understanding with speed and dexterity; bright: a quick mind.

    Perceiving or responding with speed and sensitivity; keen.

    Reacting immediately and sharply: a quick temper.

    Occurring, achieved, or acquired in a relatively brief period of time: a quick rise through the ranks; a quick profit.

    Done or occurring immediately: a quick inspection. See synonyms at fast1.

    Tending to react hastily: quick to find fault.

    Archaic.

    Alive.

    Pregnant.

    n.

    Sensitive or raw exposed flesh, as under the fingernails.

    The most personal and sensitive aspect of the emotions.

    The living: the quick and the dead.

    The vital core; the essence: got to the quick of the matter.

    adv., quicker, quickest.

    Quickly; promptly.

    [Middle English, alive, lively, quick, from Old English cwicu, alive.]

    quickly quick'ly adv.

    quickness quick'ness n.

    USAGE NOTE In speech quick is commonly used as an adverb in phrases such as Come quick. In formal writing, however, quickly is required.

    quick

    adjective

    Characterized by great celerity: breakneck, expeditious, fast, fleet, rapid, speedy, swift. Informal hell-for-leather. Idioms: quick as abunnywink. See fast/slow/velocity.

    Moving or performing quickly, lightly, and easily: agile, brisk, facile, nimble, spry. See ability/inability.

    Mentally quick and original: alert, bright, clever, intelligent, keen1, quick-witted, sharp, sharp-witted, smart. Idioms: smart as a whip. See ability/inability.

    Accomplished in very little time: brief, expeditious, fast, flying, hasty, hurried, rapid, short, speedy, swift. See fast/slow/velocity.

    noun

    A point of origin from which ideas or influences, for example, originate: bottom, center, core, focus, heart, hub, root1. See start/end.

    adverb

    In a rapid way: apace, fast, posthaste, quickly. Informal flat out, hell-for-leather, lickety-split, pronto. Idioms: full tilt, in a flash, in nothing flat, like a bat out of hell, like a blue streak, like a flash, like a house on fire, like a shot, like a streak, like greased lightning, like the wind, like wildfire. See fast/slow/velocity.

    quick

    Idioms beginning with quick:

    quick and the dead

    quick as a wink

    quick off the mark

    quick one, a

    quick on the draw

    quick

    adj

    Definition: fast, speedy

    Antonyms: lazy, slow, sluggish

    adj

    Definition: very smart

    Antonyms: dull, ignorant, slow, stupid, uneducated

    Quick

    Alive, living.

    quick (kwĭk)

    n.

    Sensitive or raw exposed flesh, as under the fingernails.

    adj., quick·er, quick·est.

    Pregnant.

    Alive.

    quick

    IN BRIEF: Done with speed. Also: Able to learn or understand easily.

    The noun quick has one meaning:

    Meaning #1: any area of the body that is highly sensitive to pain (as the flesh underneath the skin or a fingernail or toenail)

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    The adjective quick has 6 meanings:

    Meaning #1: accomplished rapidly and without delay

    Synonym: speedy

    Meaning #2: hurried and brief

    Synonyms: flying, fast

    Meaning #3: moving quickly and lightly

    Synonyms: agile, nimble, spry

    Meaning #4: apprehending and responding with speed and sensitivity

    Synonym: ready

    Meaning #5: performed with little or no delay

    Synonyms: immediate, prompt, straightaway

    Meaning #6: easily aroused or excited

    Synonym: warm

    The adverb quick has one meaning:

    Meaning #1: with little or no delay

    Synonyms: promptly, quickly

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    fast1 (făst)

    adj., fast·er, fast·est.

    Acting, moving, or capable of acting or moving quickly; swift.

    Accomplished in relatively little time: a fast visit.

    Acquired quickly with little effort and sometimes unscrupulously: made a fast buck scalping tickets.

    Quick to understand or learn; mentally agile: a class for the faster students.

    Indicating a time somewhat ahead of the actual time: The clock is fast.

    Allowing rapid movement or action: a fast running track.

    Designed for or compatible with a short exposure time: fast film.

    Disposed to dissipation; wild: ran with a fast crowd.

    Flouting conventional moral standards; sexually promiscuous.

    Resistant, as to destruction or fading: fast colors.

    Firmly fixed or fastened: a fast grip.

    Fixed firmly in place; secure: shutters that are fast against the rain.

    Firm in loyalty: fast friends.

    Lasting; permanent: fast rules and regulations.

    Deep; sound: in a fast sleep.

    adv., faster, fastest.

    In a secure manner; tightly: hold fast.

    To a sound degree; deeply: fast asleep.

    In a rapid manner; quickly.

    In quick succession: New ideas followed fast.

    Ahead of the correct or expected time: a watch that runs fast.

    In a dissipated, immoderate way: living fast.

    Archaic. Close by; near.

    [Middle English, from Old English fæst, firm, fixed.]

    fast

    adjective

    Characterized by great celerity: breakneck, expeditious, fleet, quick, rapid, speedy, swift. Informal hell-for-leather. Idioms: quick as abunnywink. See fast/slow/velocity.

    Accomplished in very little time: brief, expeditious, flying, hasty, hurried, quick, rapid, short, speedy, swift. See fast/slow/velocity.

    Lacking in moral restraint: abandoned, dissipated, dissolute, gay, incontinent, licentious, profligate, rakish, unbridled, unconstrained, uncontrolled, ungoverned, uninhibited, unrestrained, wanton, wild. See restraint/unrestraint.

    Marked by an absence of conventional restraint in sexual behavior; sexually unrestrained: easy, libertine, light2, loose, wanton, whorish. See sex/asexual.

    Permanently resistive to fading: colorfast, indelible. See continue/stop/pause.

    Persistently holding to something: clinging, firm1, secure, tenacious, tight. See free/unfree, tighten/loosen.

    Firmly settled or positioned: firm1, secure, stable, steady, strong, sure. See continue/stop/pause.

    Adhering firmly and devotedly, as to a person, a cause, or a duty: allegiant, constant, faithful, firm1, liege, loyal, staunch, steadfast, true. See continue/stop/pause, trust/distrust.

    adverb

    In a rapid way: apace, posthaste, quick, quickly. Informal flat out, hell-for-leather, lickety-split, pronto. Idioms: full tilt, in a flash, in nothing flat, like a bat out of hell, like a blue streak, like a flash, like a house on fire, like a shot, like a streak, like greased lightning, like the wind, like wildfire. See fast/slow/velocity.

    fast

    Idioms beginning with fast:

    fast buck

    fast track

    fast

    adj

    Definition: fixed, immovable

    Antonyms: flexible, impermanent, insecure, loose, movable, unattached, unfixed

    adj

    Definition: immoral, promiscuous

    Antonyms: good, moral, upright

    adj

    Definition: speedy

    Antonyms: plodding, slow, tardy, unhurried

    adv

    Definition: fixedly

    Antonyms: inconstant, loosely, unfixedly, unsteady, wavering

    adv

    Definition: speedily

    Antonyms: slow, slowly

    n

    Definition: abstention from eating

    Antonyms: binge, eating, engorgement, feast, gluttony, gorging, overindulgence, stuffing

    v

    Definition: go without food

    Antonyms: eat, glut, gorge, stuff

    fast (făst)

    adj., fast·er, fast·est.

    Acting, moving, or being capable of acting or moving quickly.

    Accomplished in relatively little time.

    Exhibiting resistance to change. Used especially of stained microorganisms that cannot be decolorized.

    Firmly fixed or fastened.

    Fast

    To play fast is to play very aggressively.

    SoundPoker Says: A maniac is a player who constantly plays fast.

    For example, "On the flop I hit a straight, so I played my hand fast."

    fast

    IN BRIEF: Moving rapidly.

    ther is not much difference in both

  • Deb
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    If something is called quick, that means it moves at a very fast speed or does not take much time to finish.

    These things are quick:

    running in a race

    driving in a car

    flying in an airplane

    The opposite of quick is slow.

    Fast can also refer to something moving at a high speed.

  • 1 decade ago

    Quick has 5 letters

    Fast only has 4

  • Quick is rapid movement across short distances using small objects. Fast is a broad rapid movement across relatively long distances.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    "Quick" means in a short amount of time, relative to time.

    "Fast" means in a short amount of time, relative to the amount of time normally expected.

    For example:

    A "Fast" solution is not always "Quick."

    If it normally takes a year to design a new product, if it only takes you 6 months, you worked "fast" but you didn't work "quickly".

    A "Quick" solution is not always "Fast."

    This distinction is harder, because it involves such small amounts of time. However imagine ten people in a contest to see who clapped their hands first. All ten would be able to do it "Quickly" but some would be "Fast" and others would be "Slow."

    In general, "Fast" connotes extended periods of time and "Quick" refers to quanta of time.

    For example, you can run a marathon "Fast," but not "Quickly."

  • 1 decade ago

    in my opinion, i think they are about the same. i think fast is better than quick, but isnt close to slow. its not that different though.

  • 1 decade ago

    i think since the words can be used interchangeably, the important thing to note is how to use it -- i think, fundamentally, quick can be used as an adverb -- "quickly" and fast can't (fastly? doesn't sound normal).

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