Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Home & GardenOther - Home & Garden · 1 decade ago

What would be your food shopping list when moving in to a new home?

I'm moving into a new home with my husband and kids. I want to make a shopping list of the food I need to remember to buy basically.

Stuff that last long and isn't really high cost but good.

7 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    This one is hard to answer without knowing you and your family's likes and dislikes. Staples are good to start with otherwise.

    Salt

    Pepper

    Mustard

    Ketchup

    BBQ Sauce

    Hot Sauce

    Steak Sauce

    Worstershire Sauce

    Soy Sauce

    Sugar

    Flour

    Baking Soda

    Baking Powder

    Cornstarch

    Spices (whatever you like)

    Vanilla

    Cocoa Powder

    Chocolate Chips

    Koolaide, Tea, Coffee (coffee filters)

    O.J., Apple Juice, Cranberry Juice

    Hot Chocolate

    Cereal, Oatmeal

    Syrup, Pancake Mix

    Butter

    Snack Bars, Granola

    Fruit Snacks, Raisins

    Nuts (whatever you like)

    Popcorn

    Vitamins

    Ibuprofen

    Toothpicks

    Cupcake Cups

    Pet Food (if needed)

    Macaroni, Spaghetti, Zitti, Rotini, Egg Noodles, etc...

    Rice

    Canned Milk

    Spaghetti Sauce

    Sloppy Joe Mix

    Pizza Sauce

    Mushroom Soup

    Cheese Soup

    Tuna

    Velveeta

    American Cheese

    Cheddar Cheese

    Mozzarella Cheese

    String Cheese

    Salsa, Chips

    Dill Pickles, Sweet Pickles, Pickle Relish

    Green Olives, Black Olives

    Peanut Butter, Jelly

    Honey, Molasses

    These are just a few ideas depending on your needs and likes. When you first move in take paper plates, napkins, plastic silverware, plastic cups and trashbags. Save yourself work and get frozen pizzas, frozen lasagnas, frozen fried chicken, pot pies or t.v. dinners. You can add a salad, frozen bread sticks, frozen garlic bread and some fruit to round out the meal. You will be working hard enough with the move and unpacking to not have to worry about cooking as well.

    Good Luck! :)

    Source(s): Life
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  • Erika
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    - Correct lighting. What breed are they? Chinese and Russians often require uvb lighting. - Good bedding, don't use carefresh, cedar or pine, use plain woodshavings or the paper wool bedding that is from pet shops. (Little bits of white chopped paper and wool layers). - BIG cages - lots of them for different sexes, a seperate one for the father so they dont back to back breed (which is fatal), and extra's incase some fight and need to be seperated. - Quiet room. - Lots of nutrition for the mothers, you'll need multiple females to breed, they can all be bred with that one male. They also can only have up to 3 litters a year, no more because its far too straining on them. She'll need protein, 2 portions per week. Such as a little slice of boiled egg or a tiny bit of cottage cheese. Vegetables too, you can look up lists, give a small amount daily when pregnant and feeding babies and after a week of them being weaned off it. Then every other day when not. - Lots of toys, babies are active. Umm...Wheels, tubes, chew toys etc - A spacious bed, especially good for birth because some run around a bit before birth and dig all the bed and stuff. - Treats twice a week that arent sugary. Or a seed bar in the cage all the time - good for gnawing on too. I know this isn't relavent, but why are you breeding? It should really be left to professionals because if you really do care about them, you should know they are really overpopulated, even if they aren't that common in your area. Also, you wont make nearly enough money out of breeding, because upkeep, food, bedding etc... adds to roughly double the amount you'll make from an average of 6-8 baby litter. I hope I helped.

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  • 1 decade ago

    If you're looking for nonperishable things to stock your cupboards, you can get things like:

    Main dishes - Pasta & pasta sauce (you can usually get pasta very cheaply on sale); soups; chili; all-in-one meals that even include the meat (like Campbell's Super Supper Bakes, for instance); canned tuna and other meats (roast beef, chicken).

    Side dishes - rice; packaged potatoes; pasta sides.

    Fruits & vegetables - you can get a ton of stuff in cans, like pineapple, pears, peaches, green beans, asparagus, corn, peas, etc. You can also get dried fruit that will keep for a very long time.

    Breakfast - packaged oatmeal; dry cereals.

    Snacks - chips, crackers, rice cakes, cookies.

    Condiments - ketchup, mayo, mustard, relish, salad dressings.

    Peanut butter, jam and bread is great to have on hand for a quick bite with no cooking and very little prep.

    Once you're ready to buy refrigerator and freezer stuff, you'll want to make a trip for dairy, fresh produce, frozen veggies, fresh meat, frozen foods like pre-made pizzas and other things that won't keep during a move without fridge access. I find I can get a lot of things for good prices when I shop at a bag-it-yourself type of grocery store.

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  • 1 decade ago

    A big bag of rice. My wife is Filipino, and they actually consider it bad luck to move into a new house without a bag of rice. When you think of it, it is very practical. Rice takes a very long time to go bad, its very filling, goes well with a lot of things, and its cheap.

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  • 1 decade ago

    i'll say rice coz i'm asian. Pasta's good too. Next comes sauces like chilli and bbq and mayonnaise. Then comes milk and sugar and eggs and salt and flour. I tend to stock up on chocolates and cookies too... =)

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Frozen dinners, like the big lasagnas and stuff.

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  • 1 decade ago

    start with staples then go from there.

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