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What is the best SUV for snow?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    You might be tempted to choose based on the "bigger is better" idea. Hummer? Pathfinder? If you're talking about deep snow when going "up north," maybe this size of SUV is what you need.

    But if you're talking about snow in urban situations, consider the Honda CR-V which has "real-time all-wheel drive" AND "vehicle stability assist" (VSA).

    Real-time AWD activates whenever there is slippage between front and rear wheels; the "computer" will kick in the AWD. The VSA feature activates when there is understeer; the "computer" will manage the throttle and brakes (4 wheel independent) to align the vehicle. Together, these features keep the CR-V very stable in snow.

    Otherwise, it's a vehicle that's practical for most urbanites/suburbanites in most situations.

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  • 1 decade ago

    All depends on your specific needs, price range, how deep the snow is, the terrain, etc. If you can provide that I can share more specifically.

    Since the Keywords are SUV and snow, I'll focus on those.

    SUV's you first have to decide if you wish for Body on Frame construction (rides on a truck frame), or it be Uni-body (like majority of passenger cars). Each have their pros/cons.

    The overkill senario would be a vehicle such as an Expedition, Tahoe, and really it's the 4x4 system they use. Usually adds about 300lbs pounds to the vehicle but truely does have a real-time system which can send power to the wheel that's slipping. And the driver can choose the setting by push-button or dial for 4-Hi, 4-Lo, Auto, etc. Couple that with a Stability control system like Advance-Trac with RSC (Roll Stability Control-Fords system), and we are talking major overkill.

    In a lesser end, you could have a vehicle such as a Volvo XC90, Freestyle, 500, Fusion which is essentially a "full time" AWD system (so it's billed), which the system doesn't require driver turning knobs. How it works is when one of the drive wheels detect slippage (the front ones on these vehicles), then it transfers power to the rear wheels, to make up for it, then once the vehicle is under control it'll remain neutral and continue to use the front wheels.

    The advantage of this system (Haldex AWD system) is it only adds about 140-200lbs to the vehicle, really only lowering the EPA fuel estimate by 1MPG city, it requires less maintenence, and with a good stability program, thats about the most 90% of people might need.

    So I''m giving you the extreme, and the less extreme variables with the info you provided :)

    Hope this helps...

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  • 1 decade ago

    I have an Envoy, its ok kind of tippy. Your best bet is to base the SUV on what you want to do with it, How many people, mine seats 7, clearance underneath, mine doesnt have alot, check how high the running boards are off the ground. Engine size, gas mileage. My envoy is about the same as a fullsize pickup which I hate. I had a 97 Jimmy and I really liked that, good clearance better gas mileage and a really tough frame, felt safe in her but she hatched the motor about a year ago.

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  • kaytor
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    In my iciness utilising adventure i've got had a 4WD SVU with All-Seasons and a Small Sedan with iciness Tires. The SVU is heavier and gets extra grip on the line so which you will upward push as much as hurry speedier and nook somewhat extra advantageous. yet whilst it includes braking it takes extra time to end and it is extra basic to lose administration. i found a robust set of iciness tires on even the lightest front wheel rigidity vehicule is positive and as one poster stated in case you come across you at the instant are not getting sufficient commencing traction in basic terms upload weight to the trunk. ward off a rear wheel rigidity vehicule because it does not carry out properly in snow inspite of snow tires. My advice is to be sure you get a automobile that your spouse feels very delicate utilising. Then on the 1st solid snowfall, she could rigidity around an empty automobile parking zone for a mutually as and get used to how the automobile maneuvers in snow and ice. it is extra advantageous to income the thank you to regulate a fish tail on an empty lot than on a hectic highway.

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  • 5 years ago

    Those of you who say the car doesn't matter, that it's the driver, are only partially right. I traded in my Suburban for Prius, and -- believe me -- the mileage is better, but the poor little thing can't even make it up a steep driveway. It can't bust out of a snowed-in, slick parking spot. I like my little zippy car, but it's getting traded in for a vehicle that can take me skiing.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The best its hard to rank suv's they all have some good points and it depends on the person who is driving. also how much money is to be spent. lower dollar suv i would have to go with jeep grand cherokee high dollar suv volkswagon toureg

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I'm going to say this, agreeing with those mentioning that it doesn't matter what car or truck you are driving...I had a Dodge Durango, 4x4 and guess what you still slide and fish tail, whether you are driving carefully or like a retard.

    The best car is one being used by a good driver.

    Source(s): Accident yesterday from someone crashin in the back of ME!
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Jeep

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    gm products

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