Can an autistic be dyslexic?

I have a student who is autistic and the school can't figure out why he is stuck on a first grade level reading and will not move up. I am not working with him and could it be that he is dyslexic? Can a child of autism have dyslexia?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    To answer your question Yes But they are seprate parts of the brain involved.

    Dyslexia is not a disease its a learning disability I have dyslexia and used to help my son class who were not reading well . My husband who is a doctor is also dyslexic You just have to figure out how the child learn once you figure out what works there's no stopping these kids They suck up knowledge like a sponge that over flows out.

    You just have to teach the child the tricks to read.

    Phonics being one of them and have them sound out all the words there having trouble on, Also if the child love to sing try to find the kids song in the late 70 called phonetic rock It teaches them about sounds and vowels and consonant's

    The second is to take a piece of paper when they read so they do not skip lines. At first going from line to line pulling the paper down as they read.Then later when they get skilled they can learn to use there fingers when they read.

    To help to keep children from transposing sometimes getting glasses with a slight peach gradient tint on them with UV helps There has been studies done in optics in this. When I was an optician in California I did this for many children over 5 years and everyone reported back how much better there child read.

    Source(s): I have dyslexia first hand knowledge
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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Teaching Children to Read http://emuy.info/ChildrenLearningReading
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  • 1 decade ago

    MA I. (that's I am for the uninitiated.)

    And I have epilepsy, anxiety and occasional depression too. ANd when the mania strikes, oooh, baby watch out. I'm a real spitfire.

    Oh, did I mention sleep apnea?

    I tell my significant other to call me "Shake and Bake." (lol)

    Come on, laugh, its OK really. Some of the best friends I've ever had in life were a) teachers who took an interest in my doing well AND b) other misfits like me.

    Also, the student is not autistic; the student has autism. I'm sure you understand...

    Lastly, and this is just an observation, the student is not autistic; the student has autism. I'm sure you understand.

    I wish the student the very best.

    Thank goodness and all that is holy for teachers like you.

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  • Ashley
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    It is possible; however, I would assume he just hasn't been taught in the "right way" for him yet. Autism is such a complex disorder and every single person diagnosed is affected differently; consequently, a million things about the way he is being taught could also be holding him back. You would have to work independently with the child for a length of time to really get to know him and how his autism affects him before you could come up with a more accurate hypothesis as to the underlying issue.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Anyone can have more than one disability. My brother has high functioning autism (Asperger's Syndrome), dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysnomia, and also has anxiety disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, attention deficit disorder, and an auditory processing disorder. All people should be tested for learning disabilities. For all you know the child may be having such a hard time because he has multiple learning disabilities and autism. It is overlooked quite a bit, because Dr.'s and the teachers say oh it's autism and quit looking for ways too help the child.

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    He *could* be, but I doubt it. It is more likely that the appropriate curriculum has not been purchased and used for him. My daughter would not read, did not understand phonics at all. The Edmark reading program made a huge difference, and in six weeks brought her from kindergarten up to second grade. She is reading independently now, and also answering questions about the material appropriately.

    Talk to the school about finding an alternative program and being trained to use it. It's the whole point behind the "I" in IEP. My daughter had all alternative curricula before we decided to homeschool.

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  • 1 decade ago

    My sister -in law is autistic , but her's is pretty severe, so she can not even read, but I would say YES......If she can read, than she has a possibility for having dyslexia, like anyone else....

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, but it could also just be the autism that's getting in the way.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Absolutely, but keep in mind if he peseverates he may be perseverating on his reading level. It might be a habit that needs to be broken in order to ascertain if he is really dyslexic.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes, why don't you try some colored transparency overlays or use a colored paper. Some times that keeps the words and letters from jumping around. Good luck

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