notacatch asked in PetsOther - Pets · 1 decade ago

Can a Landlord have tenants pay a pet deposit then tell tenants they have to pay a monthly pet fee ?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Yes. The first apartment that I lived in with a dog did just that. The deposit is to cover damage, the monthly fee is just for the ability to have pets. It does cover the added wear and tear on things and the lawn clean-up and extra litter disposal from cats. There is just a lot of extra headaches that landlords deal with when people have pets.

    If you don't agree with it, take another apartment.

  • 1 decade ago

    Actually it should have already been in the lease. However if the lease runs out, the tenant and the land lord must follow the previous lease. Anyting including the amount of rent that changes, should have a new lease.

    If there is no lease, sorry, the landlord can do whatever he wants.

    Also note, landlords are required by law to return your security deposit, less luniveable damages, i.e. large holes in the walls. If the land lord made you pay for rent on your pets, pet stains on the carpet come within the pets terms of "living" however scratched woodwork does not. Go figure.

  • 1 decade ago

    Yes and no.

    Yes if it is stated in the contract. If this is something new, the new contract should state the additional amount and why.

    No if the contract says pets are allowed with a pet deposit of $(specific amount).

    Yes if your pet was found to have damaged the premises in some way - regardless of what the original contract states. For example, if your pet has dug up lawn or garden, or urinated repeatedly in the apartment to the point that it's obvious to anyone who enters. Normally, the renters won't notice it as much as others.

  • 1 decade ago

    If you don't own the home or apartment, you don't own the structure that your pet may be damaging. While you don't necessarily thing your dog or your cat smells, or think that your pet will never mark, you also dont have to pay to replace carpet when they do if you rent. You may also not be paying for just your apartment. The landlord basically takes that fee for the one or two times he has to completely recarpet or re-drywall an apartment or home because it was destroyed by pets. So yes, they can, especially if you sign a lease saying you'll pay it.

    Source(s): Lifelong pet owner who's rented for several years with them
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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes--I have heard of that before. The pet deposit is if there is damage to the apt. The monthly fee is for just having the pet there.

  • 1 decade ago

    as long as it is apart of the lease. if it isn't you need to ask for an addendum to your current lease, so that you can have the exact amount agreed upon between both parties. This will stop any inaccuracies, or intentional fraudulent behavior on your landlords part. Often times unscrupulous landlords try to extract extra money from tenants by adding pet fees, parking fees, (for extra vehicles) for overnite or longterm guests, etc. It is best to have all this covered in writting.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes, but ONLY if it's mentioned in your rental contract. If it's not, then they have to wait until the contract is renewed (kind of like raising the rent). When I lived in the apartment, the company charged us $20 extra per pet.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes, that's what they do in most apartment builings. I had to pay $50 per pet intitally and then $10/month

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes, and it does happen. It's called "pet rent" and is paid in addition to a pet deposit.

  • 1 decade ago

    Yep.

    When we were in our apartment, there was a $150 deposit and another $50 per month.

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