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the relationship between current, resistance and voltage is given by the equation?

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  • Bill H
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Ohms law I=V/R, R=V/I, V=I*R.

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  • 1 decade ago

    To be very pedantic Ohm's Law is not resistance= voltage/ current, that just follows from the definition of resistance, but rather that the ratio of voltage to current is a constant. Ohm's Law does not hold for all devices, e.g. a diode has an exponential relationship between current and voltage.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Quinnte2 is right, (as are the others quoting the Ohms Law formula, I=E/R equasion, in their own way).

    Given a circuit of a certain resistance, increasing the applied voltage will increase the current in the circuit.

    Ohms Law states that 'The CURRENT in a given circuit (of a set RESISTANCE) is DIRECTLY proportional to the VOLTAGE applied'. in other words, twice the voltage, twice the current and so on.

    The Ohms Law formula is merely the above statement in Mathematical form, transposed to highlight current.

    Source(s): Personal
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  • 4 years ago

    Yes, the resistance should be the same. The circuit element called a "resistor" is supposed to maintain a constant resistance for all voltages (unless you put such a high voltage on it that it overheats and melts). Some things, such as the filament in incandescent light bulbs, change resistance as the voltage across them changes. But the usual assumption in analyzing circuits is that resistors are constant, always the same resistance.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Its governed by Ohm's law young lady....One of the most known laws out there!!!!

    V=RI

    Where V is voltage (i.e The pressure of the current measured in volts.)

    R is resistance ( Usually the resistance built up inside due to imperfections in whatever material the wire is manufactured from)

    I is the current, (the amount of electricity) in the system, measured in Amperes.

    Use this trangle to solve any one unknown of the 3;

    V

    I R

    In other words V over I is R, I times R is V etc.

    Remember this as it's very useful........

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  • Como
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    I = current in amps

    R = resistance in ohms

    V = voltage in volts

    I = V/R

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  • 1 decade ago

    used to remember by the method below

    V

    R C

    voltage = resistance multiplied by current

    resistance = voltage divided by current

    current = voltage divided by resistance

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  • 1 decade ago

    The relationship between voltage and current is governed by IMPEDANCE, which is made up of a combination of resistive, capacitive, and inductive elements.

    In its simplest form, capacitance = inductance = 0 and the equation becomes:

    (Voltage in volts) = (Current in amperes) * (Resistance in ohms)

    For capacitive elements, the equation becomes:

    (Voltage in volts) = (Current in amperes) / (Capacitance in farads)

    For inductive elements, the equation becomes:

    (Voltage in volts) = (Current in amperes) * (Inductance in henries)

    ... Note that both capacitive and inductive elements are frequency-dependent!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    resistance = voltage divided by current

    resistance is measured in ohms, voltage (or potential difference) is measured in volts, and current is measured in amps

    hope i was of some help =]

    Source(s): no source, just my knowledge :P
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  • 1 decade ago

    guess by now you will know that V=I xR.

    Known by all as Ohms Law.

    remember by the triangle

    V

    I R

    Transposed

    V=I.R

    I=V/R

    R=V/I

    Not the end of the story as this is only a 2 dimensional rule with limited applications.

    Also only really relevant for dc circuit or circuits with low reactances, where power factor come in.

    having said that still very useful.

    Source(s): Too much study..
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  • 1 decade ago

    V=IxR ( V=Volts I=Amps R=ohms)

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