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asked in 教育及參考書教學 · 1 decade ago

可唔可以用150字ge 英文字講周星馳ge資料有咩成就??

*150 english姒上

1 *周星馳生平<<<1+2=150字

2*周星馳成就<<<<1+2=150字

*你對佢有咩feeling,,,,(30字,,,)

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  • nicole
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Stephen Chow (also Stephen Chaiu) (traditional Chinese : 周星馳; simplified Chinese : 周星驰; Romanticized as: Chow Sing Chi ; pinyin : Zhōu Xīngchí) (born June 22, 1962) is a highly popular Hong Kong actor and director, whose expertise in the field of comedy has led him to be dubbed the "The King of Comedy" by the Hong Kong entertainment media. However, his brand of comedy, which includes puns, doubles-entendres and poking fun at Chinese culture, meant that few of his films could exercise much impact in the West until his latter films, Shaolin Soccer and Kung Fu Hustle.

    Professional career

    The films themselves often follow a similar template: Chow portrays an under-achiever who beats either the odds, or an arrogant overachiever, who is then humbled and receives a lesson at the hand of Chow. Fight Back to School (1991), From Beijing With Love (1994) and God of Cookery (1996) are notable examples of this style of work. Sometimes, his films would utilize a historic environment, but demonstrate the same use of comedy, as in the films Justice, My Foot (審死官) (1992) and Flirting Scholar (1993).

    Occasionally, however, Chow would break from his comedies. One of his more serious films is A Chinese Odyssey (1994), loosely based on the classic Chinese epic Journey to the West. Although essentially a comedy at heart, Chow was able to develop his character more seriously than ever before. It was a box-office smash in Hong Kong and even ignited a cult following in Mainland China.

    圖片參考:http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/6/6...

    圖片參考:http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/ma...

    Stephen Chow as Sing in Kung Fu Hustle.

    Recent films by Chow have begun to focus on comedic action and special effects sequences rather than verbal humour to appeal to a wider international audience. The film which launched him to international fame was Shaolin Soccer (2001), which made heavy use of CGI and was directed by Chow himself. A later film, dubbed Kung Fu Hustle (2004), was also directed by Chow and in February 2005 went on to surpass Shaolin Soccer as the highest grossing domestic movie in Hong Kong.

    In July 2006, Chow started the filming of his latest feature, A Hope, in the eastern Chinese port of Ningbo [1]. It has been rumored to have the biggest budget ever for a Chinese film, costing over 100 million Chinese yuan (US$13 million; €10.2 million).

    This latest film will introduce newcomer Zhang Yuyi as his romantic lead - continuing Chow's infamous tradition of introducing young female actresses who eventually go on to have successful film and music careers of their own. These "Chow's Cuties", including names as Gigi Leung, Karen Mok, Cecilia Cheung, Eva Huang Shengyi, Cheung Man, Christy Chung and Michelle Reis, have received major career boosts from starring in Chow's blockbusters.

    Trivia

    When he was young, Chow learned Kung Fu by watching TV because his parents couldn't afford lessons. He still enjoys watching instructional Kung Fu videos to this day.

    There is often a cameo by an ugly bearded nose-picking cross-dresser in his films, and the role is almost always portrayed by Kin-yan Lee, a personal friend. This character is almost always called 如花 (translated as "flower-like") in these films.

    Chow is a big fan of Chinese Kung Fu legend Bruce Lee, and his films often contain references to him.

    Chow, for a time, was the president of the Bruce Lee fan club in Hong Kong and had a statue of Lee built.

    Chow learned Wing Chun, an offshoot of Shaolin Kung Fu, as a youth.

    Chow often collaborated with Lee Lik-chee (李力持) and Vincent Kok (谷德昭), both actors and directors, in the early stage of his career.

    Chow is mentioned in the Regurgitator song "My Ego".

    Despite having a comic persona onscreen, in the public eye, Chow is known to be the opposite, often maintaining a serious demeanor.

    Chow is also a big fan of the popular anime/manga series, Dragonball.

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