Why is Ford garbage? I love my car, but ..?

The rest of it is pure garbage. Windows stopped working, interior is so unfunctionable and who designed it? What the ? is my scream almost everyday My car is a 89 Ford Mustang GT convertable. Is there a chance of salvation for this piece? Its seems to be one thing going wrong on it right after the next. I am done.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Trade it in on a new Toyota.. everyone else is.. that is why Ford Motor Company is dying a slow ugly death...

  • 1 decade ago

    ... and my Dad had a '62 Ford Fairlane that ran reliable as a Swiss watch for 13 years ... then he sold it to a kid in the 'hood to haul his snowmobile (for another 6 years I know of).

    American cars are highly variable; day of the week they are assembled, mood of the assembler, etc., etc..

    Personally I've driven the cars built in Marysville, Ohio for the past 19 years with very little trouble (like maybe once every couple years we visit to see if there's anyone new at the dealership) kind of very little trouble.

    That's my experience anyhow. I ALSO like "unique" so in addition to my "daily driver", I've also driven a Ferrari, a Corvair, a Fleetwood Brougham, two Rabbits and a Beetle, an Ambassodor, a Hilman Minx, a Thunderbird, and ... my current "fun car", a '97 Miata.

    But when push comes to shove and I need reliable, out comes the "daily driver" from Marysville and off we go ... although my wife is rather partial to her XL-7 I think. :-)

    So don't despair. Your best bet is to find a dealership or service shop that you can trust 100% and buy whatever they're selling that suits you. New is better if you have the money because then repairs are done by someone you can trust and paid for by the manufacturer! Used is okay too ... except for my first Marysville car, all have been used.

    On the bright side, the Ford Mustang GT has quite a fan base so it shouldn't be hard to sell or trade in. Check out BlueBook to make sure you're close to a realistic value no matter which way you go.

    Source(s): Kelly Blue Book: http://www.kbb.com/
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The eighties were not known for the production of quality domestic cars. The Mustang 'Fox' body was the last holdover of a very dark and forgetable era in automotive history. Your Mustang started life as a Ford Fairmont and inherited all the retarded engineering, rotten build quality and poor materials of cars past. The only salvation you may have is the fact that there are so many replacement parts on the market for your pony that you could build one from scratch. Your GT is quickly becoming a very sought after ride so if you are willing to invest some dough into repairs and put up with the weirdness of a car that routinely tries to self destruct you may have a real investment. One thing for certain, you won't lose it in a parking lot and you see fewer and fewer of them on the roads. I own a '97 GT and though it is very coarse, loud, stiff and downright primative it is light years ahead of your '89 in dependability and build quality. You may be happier trading-up.

    www.mustangsunlimited.com This is a VERY good source for Mustang parts.

    Source(s): Life and all it's rewards
  • 1 decade ago

    I'm not saying that Fords are crap. Your car is 17 or 18 years old and American cars weren't made to last. You can save your car but you'll have to invest lots of money and with ANY care that old it is common to repair one thing after another but if you think about it, the repairs are cheaper than the payments on a brand new car. If you can keep hold of your car for another 3 to 4 years, it will be a classic and then it's a short step to being an antique.

    In my opinion, keep your car and flip off the automobile companies, you deserve your money not them.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Well, the first thing that came to mind is that it's old enough to vote.

    I have owned quite a few cars and motorcycles that are over 15 years old, of American, Japanese, even British origin. They all had something wrong with them when I bought them and developed more troubles. You usually have two options: Fix EVERYTHING on it that's worn out, or learn to live with it.

    In some cases, I have been able to repair a worn out car to the point that it held together like an almost-new one. It takes a lot of time and money, though, so you will need to decide if it's worth it.

  • 1 decade ago

    My Dodge from 1991 had all power windows fail, a stinking gas smell in the passenger compartment, and had a mystery coolant leak that necessitated engine replacement before it gave up the ghost in 2003. It's not just Ford. It's the aging process of the American Automobile -- and machines in general. they get used up.

  • 1 decade ago

    We retired from Ford Motor Assembly line, We would be happy to take this car off your hands, We like working on Fords, because we know how.

    Source(s): Ford Worker
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    They don,t make cars like in the 60s. Restore it. Take it off the road and fix it right.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    We have had two Fords, and both performed satisfactorily. Neither was replaced because of mechanical issues.

  • 1 decade ago

    i had a 1995 Ford Contour and it only had 145,000 miles on it when the motor stoped runing i had oil and everything in it they told me it needed to be rebuild so i have it in my back yard for parts

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