When was the Bible "finished"?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    95 A.D. the last book was finished. Over time spurious documents surfaced. Finally a church council was called to close the canon in 325 A.D. The same 66 books in use in 95 A.D. were the ones confirmed at the council of Nicea in 325.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The Canon of Scripture - the official list of the 73 inspired works which comprise Scripture - was completed once and for all time by the bishops of the Holy Catholic Church, gathered in Council at Carthage, North Africa, in 397 AD. Prior to that time some local churches used the list drawn up by Athanasius, but many others used other lists from various sources. Many of those lists included works which are not now part of the Bible. And many of the books which are part of the Bible were debated among the local churches. That is why the Pope called the Council of Carthage to finalize the Canon. Since then not a word has been added to the Bible or deleted from it. Except of course by Martin Luther who attempted to throw out 10 books of the inspired Word of God. Fortunately his followers rebelled at the notion of throwing out the writings of the Apostles themselves, so the New Testament books Luther intended to trash were saved, though Luther did manage to sneak a few words into the text in an effort to create seeming support for his novel ideas. But sadly, the seven Old Testament books, which every Christian on earth had used for over 1,200 years, were thrown out like so much garbage. So, today the Protestant "Bible" has only 66 books, and if their founder had his way it would have only 63. But the true and complete Bible still has exactly the same 73 books it had at the end of the 4th Century, when it was completed.

    So, the answer to your question is: The true and complete Bible was finished in 397 AD, and remains exactly the same today. The Protestant Bible was "finished" in the mid 1500's, by throwing out portions of the true Bible that condemned some of Luther's new teachings.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The last book in the Bible (Revelation) was written around AD 70. After that, various handwritten copies of the New Testament letters were circulated throughout the Mediterranean and the Middle East. The early Christian church also had copies of the Old Testament. Often times these manuscripts were in different languages, usually in Hebrew and Greek.

    The earliest New Testament was estimated to have been completed around AD 100 and the entire Bible was translated into Latin in AD 382 by St. Jerome.

    The actual books of the Bible as we know them today were organized in AD 315 by Athenasius shortly after Constantine's conversion in AD 313.

    John Wycliffe produced the first handwritten Bibles in English in 1380, however by 500, the Bible had been translated into about 500 different languages.

    Some have suggested, especially since the popularity of the Dan Brown novel; The DaVinci Code, that there was a council that officially decided on which books stayed and which ones were thrown out. In fact, that was not how the canon of scripture was derived.

    For more information, check out the links listed below.

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  • 1 decade ago

    What an excellent question!

    The link listed below can get a good history on the time line of Bible. Some of the original scrolls were just found in the 1950's I think it was. They were found in a cave and there is an amazing story that goes along with it as to how the ones who found it sort of knew what it was but they sat on them for quite awhile and then they went there and here before the actual process of authenticating started which was a long drawn out process to prove they were actually the real McCoys.

    Then it took a long time to translate it because the language that was used back then has changed so much.

    It's been several years since I've read the book on this story, and now I'm thinking they were called the Dead Sea Scrolls. Oh, maybe I shouldn't even say that in case I'm wrong, because I don't want to give you false or even partially wrong information. Hopwfully, a more informed Christian can answer this for you. I would love to see some of the original manuscripts, just like I would love to go to Jerusalem and walk the path that Jesus walked when He was crucified.

    Happy New Year!!!

    www.bible-history.com/quotes/william_f_albright_3.html

    http://www.bible-history.com/quotes/william_f_albr...

    Go

    Source(s): a faulty 52 year old brain & the web searching
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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  • 1 decade ago

    The last great battle took place in the early 1500s when Martin Luther railed and fought against the presence of James in the Bible. Since then, w/ the printing press more or less standardizing things, the Bible is as we see it. There are 3 other books the size of the NT attached to it that have unofficial standing as "worthy of a read, but insufficient for serious theology."

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  • 1 decade ago

    The Bible as it stands is a collection of various books by various authors. There are many books missing, to which the Bible itself refers. Perhaps one day we will find more, and be able to expand the scriptures.

    As for the scripture about "not adding to" the words, that was written by John in Revelation, and he was only referring to his own writing. At that time, the Bible didn't even exist. Therefore, people who claim we can't add to the Bible because of a sentence that John wrote in his own book, don't have much knowledge or understanding of the scriptures and how they came to be.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Acts and Revelation were the last books to be accepted. The eastern churches didn’t accept Revelation until the 4th century. The concerns of the churches were that the texts accepted as Scripture be attributable to Apostles or those closely associated with the Apostles. There was great concern that the New Testament Scripture be the accounts of the earliest Christians. By 405 A.D., the New Testament as we know it was widely accepted in most Christian churches.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The Bible is boring and pointless. Who cares when it was finished.

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  • 1 decade ago

    In the '90's. the 0090's. No one knows the exact year, we just know it was in that decade and finished by John of Patmos when he finished the Book of Revelation (this is NOT the Apostle John!).

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