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how much is a smith and wesson model 64 worth?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Not a whole lot. Smith and Wesson made so many k-frame model 10/64 service revolvers over the years. I have seen them used for as little as $259 at guns shops in decent shape. "Gun value" books are not very accuarte and people do not follow them as rigidly as the automobile blue book. It all depends on the region where you live. But with the Smith and Wesson k-frames, only old and minty models bring prices.

    Also, stainless k-frames did not come out until the 1970s (the dreaded Bangor Punta era) which makes them even less of a demand to collectors.

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  • lou
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Smith And Wesson Model 64

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    how much is a smith and wesson model 64 worth?

    Source(s): smith wesson model 64 worth: https://shortly.im/RqOkx
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  • bferg
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    MODEL 64 M & P

    - .38 Spl. +P cal., satin stainless Model 10, 6 shot, 2 (disc. 2005), 3, or 4 in. barrel, K-frame, 3 (square butt disc. 1992) and 4 in. (square butt only) barrels are heavy, current production uses Uncle Mike's combat grips, 30 1/2 - 36 oz.

    100% .98% .95% .90% .80% .70% 60%

    $390 $295 $220 $175 $140 $125 $105

    There have been 7 engineering changes to this model.

    Source(s): 27th Edition Blue Book of Gun Values
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  • 3 years ago

    S&w Model 64

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  • 4 years ago

    If its the standard model 1000 Semi-auto the high book value is $410, low book is $200. If its the junior model, which has a shortened stock with a 22" barrel, high book value is $425, and low book is $200. These shotguns were imported for Mossberg from 1986-1987.

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  • randkl
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    S&W pissed off a lot of shooters a few years back when they caved in and threw their support behind the loons at Handgun Control Inc. They sided with the anti-gunners against the shooters. At that time, their stock bottomed out at 1/4 its previous value and you coulda bought S&W for the price of a Happy Meal. Most serious shooters, me included, dumped their S&W's at rock bottom prices just to be rid of them. A lot of us won't ever buy any S&W product ever again.

    The S&W 64 is a common one and the market for buyers is really lean. You can find them on gunbroker.com etc for $220-270 for weeks with no bidders. If I were selling it, I'd ask $250 reserve and cross my fingers.

    It's a great pistol. One of my all time favs, in fact. If you sell it, chances are you'll never get a chance to buy back that much pistol at that low a price. You might want to think about keeping it and shooting it yourself.

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  • M R S
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Bferg's answer is the correct one. Simply judge the condition of the gun by percentage and the values are listed below. The book he is using takes into account the current market and condition of the firearm. Just remember that even if your gun's value is $1000.00, its only worth what someone else is willing to pay for it, but to you it may be priceless to you.

    Nice work bferg !

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    If you're wanting to sell it, my advice would be to avoid selling it to a dealer or pawn shop. Go to gunbroker.com and list it there. Just like ebay, maximum exposure and good prices. Then whoever buys it needs to give you the mailing address of a local dealer in their area and you ship the gun to them via UPS or FedEx.

    Check gunbroker to see what your particular handgun is typically selling for.

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