TOPDOG asked in HealthMental Health · 1 decade ago

post traumatic stress disorder?

I have been suffering from this disorder, panic, major depression ptsd. I am seeing a doctor for 3 plus years, many medications. I retired from the USMC, and was a superlative Marine, why did this pop up and it so hard, to where I had to medically retire from Law Enforcement, I have gotten many answers, but I curious to what others may say thaat are dealing with these disorders I WISH NOT TO DISCUSS MY 21 year Military career at this point, all advice is welcome. Thanks and God Bless, and pray for peace

10 Answers

Relevance
  • Rusty
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    If you survived 21 years USMC with no problem and the PTSD began at you civilian job, I would guess that the job was more stressful than USMC.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but PTSD can be a serious threat to mental health. It can be involved with repressed memories that you can't even reach conciously, yet some circumstances can bring panic attacks, etc. for reasons only your sub-concious mind can determine. I wish I could help, but the only person I know who beat it is now an ordained minister. I'm not much one to support organized religion, but he seems much better than he was after 5 years home from Nam. It's not something that most could use as a cure.

    I know several with PTSD, meds didn't seem to help them much. It was difficult to find the right therapist, more difficult yet to open up, and the emotional turmoil after a session sometimes didn't fade away for several weeks. Some didn't think it would help and so they didn't continue.

    My cousin got lucky. He found a psychotherapist that had been in Vietnam. The therapist influenced the Psychiatrist enough to get him to do medication reviews at my cousins home. He still has his moments, but he could talk with the therapist in ways he never would have been able to talk to someone who hadn't been there. The Psychiatrist going to his house let him be in a more secure zone than he would have been going to an office. It all helped. He still has times when he'll come up to visit and go to the woods, his time to put things in order he says.

    I don't know if this is even a possibility for you. I'd look for a therapist that had experience in somewhat similar situations or locations as you. If it doesn't seem to work after a couple visits, try a new one. I don't think you'll find a Psychiatrist to do home visits, but you may find one that lets the therapist do the therapy, while he concentrates on meds. without prying into your affairs. The therapist is the real key, it takes a long time to deal with PTSD, from what I've seen, and I wouldn't spend that time with someone I wasn't confortable with or confident in. I wish you the very best in finding a therapist you can relate to, and the strength to do what must be done for healing to take place. Coming from the Marines you may find this more difficult than you would have thought, but with the right therapist you will succeed. Good Luck, and may God, or whatever power is out there, help you!

    Source(s): 1973, Got my lotto #, never got inducted. Lots of my friends, relatives, and friends older brothers went, most as volunteers, some drafted. Not all came home, those that did sometimes brought memories they weren't even aware they had. 5 years later it was named PTSD.
    • Login to reply the answers
  • Darcy
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    I have had PTSD for a year now, after going through a life-threatening situation with my husband. I have (seriously) overwhelming anxiety and major depression. I tried Zoloft for a month, it helped the depression some but did nothing for the anxiety (which would trigger horrific flashbacks). My doctor switched me to Effexor, which has dramatically decreased both the depression and anxiety to manageable levels (no more flashbacks!). This is the drug from hell, however--side effects can be severe (I had some bad ones for about three weeks); I took it for about 7 weeks last year then quit cold turkey (thinking I was okay). The withdrawal was unbelieveable! There is no way to describe how awful it was. This time, when my doctor says it is time, I will definitely wean off the proper way (which I understand is still bad). Even with the negatives, Effexor pulled me back from the brink of suicide. My advice: do a lot of research on PSTD and alternative drugs & treatments, talk to your therapist and/or psychiatrist about everything, and above all, don't give up! I may not have overcome PTSD yet, but I am determined to do so. I think that is a major part of the battle. Good luck to you!

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    What exactly are you asking??? A lot of people can suffer from PSTD.... major depression, or panic disorders. I understand not wanting to discuss the hell you went through for 21 years serving in the military... I am suffering from the whole PSTD and i dont talk about the past with anyone either... there are some subjects i touch lightly on but for the most part i "ignore" and try to avoid the rest... I am now seeing a counselor that my husband and i had started going to for marriage... tho my husband only has went 3 times, im dreading the whole past crap... I have been lucky nothing has been said or brought up but dread the day he "questions" yet at the same time im young and i dont want to be on drugs the rest of my life... i find myself going on and off antidepressants since i was like 17ish? I just went back off them because i am expecting a baby, buttttt i know ill be back on them eventually because thats how it goes.

    good luck to you..

    what kind of doc have u been seeing for 2 years? a psychologist, psychiatrist, or a regular medical doctor?

    Source(s): college psych classes
    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    My ex-husband suffers from ptsd. He was in the Vietnam war at the age of 18. It really took a toll on him. He goes to counseling every week at the VA but they never address the real problems. They just get guys together and let them talk about what they went through. My ex-husband is so paranoid he thinks his mother is trying to kill him.

    Whatever you do don't rely on the VA solely for help. See an outside psychiatrist for help. My ex-husband is the most loving man I know when he's having a good day, but those were very few. He's even afraid to take any kind of medication because he's so paranoid. Don't let yourself get this way. Seek help soon from a reputable psychiatrist that can put you on medication and monitor your overall mental health. I think my ex-husband could have been helped if someone had helped him seek proper support for his condition.

    Good luck to you and God bless you.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Many medications and 3+ years with a doctor...? That does not sound like it is effective. I don't think you have discovered the source or your problem. MDMA would be very effective if it were legal, really unmasks your feelings. However, drugs over the long term are not good. Try a new doctor and maybe try "being depressed" for a while. Suppressing a natural response seems wrong.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    first...sorry to hear that you are suffering...thank you though for serving....i have PTSD...i can not even begin to explain how it has torn my life apart..i have been in heavy therapy for 7 years now and am on a couple meds...it is a slow process...there is no time limit to this...ppl who have never experienced it can not imagine the pain...let me guess..you have flashbacks, nightmares and night terrors...daytime is hell too...i was at the peak of my career, and life....and it all hit...i am on disability at the age of 43...i would love to chat with you more on this if you wish but if not...please..find a good therapist..someone you can learn to trust....someone who will stick it out with you and who has experience with PTSD....God bless you hun....feel free to email me...

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Bless you for your service! I am so sorry that you are suffering. I do not have an answer to your problem, but my thoughts are with you.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Members of my family suffer like that. We all care about you.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    i am on stress pills

    mood pills

    and anti depresants

    you can talk to me

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.