What is the highest and lowest elevation of a point on a topographic map?

How do you figure out the highest and lowest elevation of a point on a topographic map?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    All of the above answers are correct in describing how to find a specific altitude of a location. However, the highest and lowest altitudes on a given map can be found somewhere in the map key. I am positive it is this way for military maps, and I am fairly certain it's true for USGS and aviation maps.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Highest and Lowest point on a topographical map can be distin guished by checking out the spot heights.They r the heights of specific places in the map from above the sea level printed in black ink.These heights will be marked in a regular map at different points.You should study the map carefully to find those.

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  • 1 decade ago

    You should see lines on your map that show elevation increase. Check your map key or the small numbers by those lines to see the increase in elevation between the lines. EX: If your first line to second line is 20 ft then your second line to third line will be another 20ft. If you come to a line that has tick marks all around it, that is a decrease in elevation NOT an increase.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Dear

    for height determination, you have to see

    contours or isohypes

    spot heights

    benchmarks

    survey tree

    trigonometrical station

    form lines

    and hachures

    on the basis of colour, tints, you can go for determination of height

    dark brown colour denotes maximum height

    white with blue dots represents depression.

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  • 4 years ago

    They are all written there. The thick lines interval is 400, thin lines 80.

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